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Equity, discrimination and remote policy: Investigating the centralization of remote service delivery in the Northern Territory

Markham, Francis; Doran, Bruce

Description

Two hypotheses have been advanced to explain the spatial patterning of service accessibility. The bureaucratic hypothesis holds that spatial inequalities are unpatterned and result from the application of decisions rules, while the competing political hypothesis suggests that politically-motivated decision making results in discriminatory outcomes. We use the example of the centralization of service provision in remote Indigenous communities in Australia's Northern Territory to show that these...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorMarkham, Francis
dc.contributor.authorDoran, Bruce
dc.date.accessioned2015-03-11T23:05:37Z
dc.date.available2015-03-11T23:05:37Z
dc.identifier.issn0143-6228
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/12876
dc.description.abstractTwo hypotheses have been advanced to explain the spatial patterning of service accessibility. The bureaucratic hypothesis holds that spatial inequalities are unpatterned and result from the application of decisions rules, while the competing political hypothesis suggests that politically-motivated decision making results in discriminatory outcomes. We use the example of the centralization of service provision in remote Indigenous communities in Australia's Northern Territory to show that these hypotheses may in fact be complementary. In recent years, government rhetoric about Australia's remote Indigenous communities has moved to focus on economic viability instead of social justice. One policy realization of this rhetoric has been the designation of ‘growth towns’ and ‘priority communities’ to act as service hubs for surrounding communities. The introduction of such hubs was examined and substantial inequality in access to service hubs was found. Inequality and overall system efficiency could be reduced with by optimizing the selection of hubs but the imposition of any hub-and-spoke mode in the study area was associated with racially-patterned patterned inequality of access. We conclude that when policy contexts are politically motivated, the application of racially-blind decision rules may result in raciallydiscriminatory spatial inequalities.
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.rights© 2015 Elsevier.
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.sourceApplied Geography
dc.subjectSpatial inequality
dc.subjectAccessibility
dc.subjectService provision
dc.subjectCentralization
dc.subjectRemote Australia
dc.titleEquity, discrimination and remote policy: Investigating the centralization of remote service delivery in the Northern Territory
dc.typeJournal article
local.identifier.citationvolume58
dc.date.issued2015
local.identifier.absfor160403 - Social and Cultural Geography
local.identifier.absfor160499 - Human Geography not elsewhere classified
local.identifier.ariespublicationa383154xPUB2910
local.publisher.urlhttp://www.elsevier.com/
local.type.statusAccepted Version
local.contributor.affiliationMarkham, F., Fenner School of Environment and Society, The Australian National University
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage105
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage115
local.identifier.doi10.1016/j.apgeog.2015.01.020
local.identifier.absseo920506 - Rural Health
dc.date.updated2015-12-11T07:48:10Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84922962967
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
dc.provenancehttp://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/issn/0143-6228/..."Author's post-print on open access repository after an embargo period of between 12 months and 48 months" from SHERPA/RoMEO site (as at 7/05/15)
dc.rights.licenseCreative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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