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The effect of early onset common mental disorders on educational attainment in Australia

Leach, L. S.; Butterworth, Peter

Description

Early onset mental disorders may lead to the early termination of education and thereby have long term adverse social and economic consequences on outcomes such as employment and financial security. This issue is important to address as governments seek to develop new ways to minimise the impacts of mental health problems and maximise workforce participation. The current investigation examines the impact of early onset affective, anxiety and substance use disorders on the early termination of...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorLeach, L. S.
dc.contributor.authorButterworth, Peter
dc.date.accessioned2015-03-05T22:40:14Z
dc.date.available2015-03-05T22:40:14Z
dc.identifier.issn0165-1781
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/12823
dc.description.abstractEarly onset mental disorders may lead to the early termination of education and thereby have long term adverse social and economic consequences on outcomes such as employment and financial security. This issue is important to address as governments seek to develop new ways to minimise the impacts of mental health problems and maximise workforce participation. The current investigation examines the impact of early onset affective, anxiety and substance use disorders on the early termination of secondary school education in Australia. The analyses used data from those aged between 20 and 34 in the 2007 Australian National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing (NSMHWB) (n=2055). The NSMHWB is a population based survey administered by the Australian Bureau of Statics and included a WMH-CIDI 3.0 assessment to determine whether respondents met diagnostic criteria for any lifetime affective, anxiety, and/or substance use disorder as well as age of onset information. The results show that early onset mental disorders are significantly associated with the termination of secondary education in Australia, particularly early onset substance use disorders such as alcohol, cannabis and stimulant use. These disorders were most likely to disrupt completion in the middle years of high school (year 10 completion), in comparison to the final year 12 milestone. Policies and interventions promoting prevention and early intervention and offering educational support for young people with psychiatric illness and substance use problems, should intervene prior to the middle years of high school to help prevent adverse social and economic consequences.
dc.description.sponsorshipP. B. was supported by the National Healthand Medical Research Council Career Development Award Fellowship,525410.
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.rights© Elsevier Ireland
dc.sourcePsychiatry Research
dc.subjectAdult
dc.subjectAge of Onset
dc.subjectAustralia
dc.subjectEarly Diagnosis
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectHealth Surveys
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectMental Disorders
dc.subjectPsychiatric Status Rating Scales
dc.subjectEducational Status
dc.titleThe effect of early onset common mental disorders on educational attainment in Australia
dc.typeJournal article
local.identifier.citationvolume199
dcterms.dateAccepted2012-03-20
dc.date.issued2012
local.identifier.absfor111714 - Mental Health
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4056230xPUB192
local.publisher.urlhttp://www.elsevier.com/
local.type.statusPublished version
local.contributor.affiliationButterworth, P, Centre for Research on Ageing, Health and Wellbeing, The Australian National University
local.contributor.affiliationLeach, L. S., Centre for Research on Ageing, Health and Wellbeing, The Australian National University
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/525410
local.identifier.essn1872-7123
local.bibliographicCitation.issue1
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage51
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage57
local.identifier.doi10.1016/j.psychres.2012.03.040
local.identifier.absseo920410 - Mental Health
dc.date.updated2015-12-09T07:57:32Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84869082789
local.identifier.thomsonID000312045000009
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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