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The role of hardship in the association between socio-economic position and depression

Butterworth, P.; Olesen, S. C.; Leach, L. S.

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OBJECTIVE: It is well established that socio-economic position is associated with depression. The experience of financial hardship, having to go without the essentials of daily living due to limited financial resources, may explain the effect. However, there are few studies examining the link between financial hardship and diagnosable depression at a population level. The current paper addresses this gap and also evaluates the moderating effect of age. METHOD: Data were from 8841 participants...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorButterworth, P.
dc.contributor.authorOlesen, S. C.
dc.contributor.authorLeach, L. S.
dc.date.accessioned2015-03-04T22:03:14Z
dc.date.available2015-03-04T22:03:14Z
dc.identifier.issn0004-8674
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/12808
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: It is well established that socio-economic position is associated with depression. The experience of financial hardship, having to go without the essentials of daily living due to limited financial resources, may explain the effect. However, there are few studies examining the link between financial hardship and diagnosable depression at a population level. The current paper addresses this gap and also evaluates the moderating effect of age. METHOD: Data were from 8841 participants aged 16–85 years in Australia’s 2007 National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing. The 12-month prevalence of depressive episode was assessed using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Measures of socio-economic position included: financial hardship, education, labour-force status, occupational skill, household income, main source of income, and area-level disadvantage. RESULTS: Financial hardship was more strongly associated with depression than other socio-economic variables. Hardship was more strongly associated with current depression than with prior history of depression. The relative effect of hardship was strongest in late adulthood but the absolute effect of hardship was greatest in middle age. CONCLUSIONS: The results demonstrate the critical role of financial hardship in the association between socio-economic disadvantage and 12-month depressive episode, and suggest that social and economic policies that address inequalities in living standards may be an appropriate way to reduce the burden attributable to depression.
dc.description.sponsorshipPB is supported by NHMRC Population Health Career Development Award Fellowship No. 525410.
dc.format10 pages
dc.publisherSAGE Publications
dc.rights© The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2012
dc.sourceAustralian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
dc.subjectAdolescent
dc.subjectAdult
dc.subjectAged
dc.subjectAustralia
dc.subjectDepression
dc.subjectEducational Status
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectHealth Surveys
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectIncome
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectMiddle Aged
dc.subjectOccupations
dc.subjectPoverty
dc.subjectPrevalence
dc.subjectSocioeconomic Factors
dc.subjectEpidemiology
dc.subjectHardship
dc.subjectSocio-economic status
dc.titleThe role of hardship in the association between socio-economic position and depression
dc.typeJournal article
local.identifier.citationvolume46
dc.date.issued2012-04
local.identifier.absfor111714 - Mental Health
local.identifier.ariespublicationu5088582xPUB9
local.publisher.urlhttp://www.uk.sagepub.com/
local.type.statusPublished version
local.contributor.affiliationButterworth, Peter John, Centre for Research on Ageing Health & Wellbeing, CMBE/RSPH, The Australian National University
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/525410
local.identifier.essn1440-1614
local.bibliographicCitation.issue4
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage364
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage373
local.identifier.doi10.1177/0004867411433215
local.identifier.absseo920203 - Diagnostic Methods
dc.date.updated2015-12-08T02:57:51Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84865308262
local.identifier.thomsonID000303184600014
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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