Skip navigation
Skip navigation

Factors associated with the timing and onset of cannabis use and cannabis use disorder: results from the 2007 Australian National Survey of Mental Health and Well-Being

Butterworth, Peter; Slade, Tim; Degenhardt, Louisa

Description

INTRODUCTION AND AIMS. To investigate the predictors of both initiation of cannabis use and transition to cannabis use disorder (CUD) in a nationally representative sample using discrete-time survival analyses. DESIGN AND METHODS. Data from a nationally representative sample of 6935 Australian adults. Retrospective data on age of first cannabis use and onset of CUD were used to construct pseudo-longitudinal datasets and survival models used to evaluate factors associated with age of first use...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorButterworth, Peter
dc.contributor.authorSlade, Tim
dc.contributor.authorDegenhardt, Louisa
dc.date.accessioned2015-03-04T01:59:04Z
dc.date.available2015-03-04T01:59:04Z
dc.identifier.issn0959-5236
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/12770
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION AND AIMS. To investigate the predictors of both initiation of cannabis use and transition to cannabis use disorder (CUD) in a nationally representative sample using discrete-time survival analyses. DESIGN AND METHODS. Data from a nationally representative sample of 6935 Australian adults. Retrospective data on age of first cannabis use and onset of CUD were used to construct pseudo-longitudinal datasets and survival models used to evaluate factors associated with age of first use and time from first use to onset of CUD. RESULTS. The oldest cohort (born 1942–1951) had lower cannabis use than younger cohorts, with first use also occurring at an older age. Multivariable discrete-time survival models showed other substance use, tobacco and alcohol use at very young ages, and mental disorders were associated with increased risk of cannabis use.There were 7.5% of those <65 years old at interview who had a lifetime CUD;mean time from first use to the onset of CUD was 3.3 years, with 90% of cases within eight years.Younger age of initiation and other substance use were strong predictors of the transition from use to CUD.Women with depression were more likely to develop a CUD; social phobia and panic disorder were also associated with transition from cannabis use to CUD. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS. Patterns of cannabis use differ across birth cohorts.There are multiple factors associated with use and transition to CUD,with other substance use a strong predictor. Mental disorders also predict initiation and progression to CUD.
dc.description.sponsorshipP. B. is supported by an Australian Research Council Future Fellowship. L. D. is supported by a National Health and Medical Research Council Principal Research Fellowship.
dc.format10 pages
dc.publisherWiley
dc.rights© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014
dc.sourceDrug and Alcohol Review
dc.subjectAustralia
dc.subjectcannabis
dc.subjectepidemiology
dc.titleFactors associated with the timing and onset of cannabis use and cannabis use disorder: results from the 2007 Australian National Survey of Mental Health and Well-Being
dc.typeJournal article
local.identifier.citationvolume33
dcterms.dateAccepted2014-06-05
dc.date.issued2014-09
local.identifier.absfor111714 - Mental Health
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4056230xPUB398
local.publisher.urlhttp://au.wiley.com/
local.type.statusPublished version
local.contributor.affiliationButterworth, Peter John, Centre for Research on Ageing Health & Wellbeing, CMBE/RSPH, The Australian National University
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/ft130101444
local.identifier.essn1465-3362
local.bibliographicCitation.issue5
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage555
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage564
local.identifier.doi10.1111/dar.12183
local.identifier.absseo920414 - Substance Abuse
dc.date.updated2015-12-09T10:57:13Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84908367095
local.identifier.thomsonID000341813800013
CollectionsANU Research Publications

Download

There are no files associated with this item.


Items in Open Research are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Updated:  19 May 2020/ Responsible Officer:  University Librarian/ Page Contact:  Library Systems & Web Coordinator