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Revisiting consensual hegemony: Brazilian regional leadership in question

Burges, Sean

Description

A central challenge confronting Brazilian foreign policy is its reluctance to accept measures that might restrict national autonomy. This limits the extent to which Brazil can lead and leverage the region, particularly in the face of competing visions such as ALBA and the Pacific Alliance. The issues is Brazil’s continued reliance on a consensual hegemony approach to regional relations after neighbouring countries opened space for a more assertive leadership closer to Pedersen’s model of...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorBurges, Sean
dc.date.accessioned2015-01-05T00:51:52Z
dc.identifier.issn1384-5748
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/12463
dc.description.abstractA central challenge confronting Brazilian foreign policy is its reluctance to accept measures that might restrict national autonomy. This limits the extent to which Brazil can lead and leverage the region, particularly in the face of competing visions such as ALBA and the Pacific Alliance. The issues is Brazil’s continued reliance on a consensual hegemony approach to regional relations after neighbouring countries opened space for a more assertive leadership closer to Pedersen’s model of cooperative hegemony. Although consensual hegemony allowed Brazil to establish its project in South America, by the end of Lula’s first presidential term more was being demanded and the failure to provide leadership goods weakened Brazil’s regional position. Current questioning of Brazilian leadership on the continent is found in an almost contradictory approach that sees Brazilian diplomats pushing away suggestions of assertive leadership while more concrete action is quietly taken by other regionally engaged sections of the Brazilian state.
dc.description.sponsorshipResearch for the paper was supported by Australian Research Council Discovery Early Career Research Award grant number DE120100401.
dc.publisherPalgrave Macmillan
dc.rights© 2015 Palgrave Macmillan
dc.sourceInternational Politics advance online publication 12 December 2014; doi: 10.1057/ip.2014.43
dc.subjectBrazil
dc.subjectforeign policy
dc.subjectItamaraty
dc.subjectSouth America
dc.subjecthegemony
dc.titleRevisiting consensual hegemony: Brazilian regional leadership in question
dc.typeJournal article
local.identifier.citationvolume52
dc.date.issued2014-12-12
local.identifier.absfor160607 - International Relations
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4266502xPUB3
local.publisher.urlhttp://www.palgrave-journals.com/
local.type.statusAccepted Version
local.contributor.affiliationBurges, Sean William, School of Politics and International Relations, Research School of Social Sciences, The Australian National University
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/de120100401
local.identifier.essn1740-3898
local.bibliographicCitation.issue2
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage193
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage207
local.identifier.doi10.1057/ip.2014.43
local.identifier.absseo940399 - International Relations not elsewhere classified
dc.date.updated2015-12-08T02:46:08Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84923082895
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
dc.provenancehttp://sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/issn/1384-5748/..."author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing) on institutional repository or funder designated repository after 12 months embargo" from SHERPA/RoMEO site (as at 24.2.20)
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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