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Property, politics and power : a history of city planning in Adelaide, Melbourne and Sydney since 1900

Sandercock, Leonie

Description

This thesis looks at the process of city planning in Australia in its political, historical, social and intellectual context. It begins by outlining the redistributive possibilities of city planning (Introduction) and then proceeds to analyse why, in practice, these possibilities have not been realised. Chapters 1 and 5 explore the extent to which the intentions of planners themselves have been 'reformist' at different times and on what understanding of society (or social theory) these...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorSandercock, Leonie
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-14T03:49:28Z
dc.date.available2017-08-14T03:49:28Z
dc.date.copyright1974
dc.identifier.otherb1014942
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/123812
dc.description.abstractThis thesis looks at the process of city planning in Australia in its political, historical, social and intellectual context. It begins by outlining the redistributive possibilities of city planning (Introduction) and then proceeds to analyse why, in practice, these possibilities have not been realised. Chapters 1 and 5 explore the extent to which the intentions of planners themselves have been 'reformist' at different times and on what understanding of society (or social theory) these intentions have been based. Chapters 2, 3 and 4 look at efforts to introduce planning as a function of government in three Australian cities between the turn of the century and the second world war and examine the nature of the opposition. Chapters 6, 7 and 8 look at planning in practice since the second world war and explore the conflicts between planning intentions and political realities. Has planning in practice reinforced or tended to ameliorate inequalities between rich and poor? Which groups benefit most from the metropolitan planning schemes now in operation in Adelaide, Melbourne and Sydney? Chapter 9 summarises the most important obstacles, particularly the private ownership of property, in the way of a more redistributive approach to city planning and assesses the likelihood of future change.
dc.format.extent1v.
dc.language.isoen
dc.subject.lcshCity planning HistoryAustralia Adelaide (S. Aust.)
dc.subject.lcshCity planning HistoryAustralia Melbourne (Vic.)
dc.subject.lcshCity planning HistoryAustralia Sydney (N.S.W.)
dc.titleProperty, politics and power : a history of city planning in Adelaide, Melbourne and Sydney since 1900
dc.typeThesis (PhD)
local.contributor.supervisorSmith, Barry
local.contributor.supervisorGollan, Bob
dcterms.valid1974
local.description.notesThis thesis has been made available through exception 200AB to the Copyright Act.
local.type.degreeDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)
dc.date.issued1974
local.contributor.affiliationThe Australian National University
local.identifier.doi10.25911/5d67b65f4aacf
dc.date.updated2017-08-04T01:13:06Z
local.identifier.proquestYes
local.mintdoimint
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