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Pattern discrimination by the honeybee: disruption as a cue

Horridge, George Adrian

Description

The discrimination of pattern disruption in freely flying honeybees (Apis mellifera) was examined. Bees were trained to discriminate at a fixed distance between a regularly repeated black/white pattern and the same pattern at a different magnification in targets of the same angular size. The locations of areas of black were regularly shuffled to make them useless as cues. The results of the experiments indicate that the bees discriminate the disruption of the pattern as a whole,...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorHorridge, George Adrian
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-02T04:06:53Z
dc.date.available2017-08-02T04:06:53Z
dc.identifier.issn0340-7594
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/122876
dc.description.abstractThe discrimination of pattern disruption in freely flying honeybees (Apis mellifera) was examined. Bees were trained to discriminate at a fixed distance between a regularly repeated black/white pattern and the same pattern at a different magnification in targets of the same angular size. The locations of areas of black were regularly shuffled to make them useless as cues. The results of the experiments indicate that the bees discriminate the disruption of the pattern as a whole, irrespective of the actual pattern. Bees trained to prefer a larger period transfer to an even larger period, when given a forced choice with a pair of patterns of differing disruption from those they were trained on, as if their spontaneous preference has not been overcome. Bees trained to prefer a smaller period, however, prefer the former negative pattern rather than transfer to an even smaller period. These results show that the bees do not rely solely on learning the absolute period of a pattern nor the relative disruption of two patterns, and they are confused when these two cues conflict in tests with unfamiliar targets. Bees can discriminate between fields of view that differ in average disruption as a generalized cue, irrespective of pattern.
dc.format11 pages
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.publisherSpringer Verlag (Germany)
dc.rights© Springer-Verlag 1997
dc.sourceJournal of Comparative Physiology A: Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
dc.subjectVision
dc.subjectSpatial frequency
dc.subjectHoneybees
dc.subjectApis mellifera
dc.subjectPattern discrimination
dc.titlePattern discrimination by the honeybee: disruption as a cue
dc.typeJournal article
local.identifier.citationvolume181
dcterms.dateAccepted1997-04-07
dc.date.issued1997-08
local.publisher.urlhttps://link.springer.com/
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationHorridge, George Adrian, Division of Biomedical Science and Biochemistry, CMBE Research School of Biology, The Australian National University
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.identifier.essn1432-1351
local.bibliographicCitation.issue3
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage267
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage277
local.identifier.doi10.1007/s003590050113
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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