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Population and Age Structure

Biddle, Nicholas

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The aim of this paper is to provide a contemporary overview of the changing size and composition of the Indigenous population. The paper is structured around six key demographic and geographic features of the Indigenous population: Age structure: The Indigenous population is relatively young; Population change: The Indigenous population is increasing at a much faster rate than the non-Indigenous population; Structural ageing: The Indigenous population is ageing and projected to...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorBiddle, Nicholas
dc.contributor.otherAustralian National University. Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research
dc.coverage.spatialAustralia
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-18T03:34:26Z
dc.date.available2017-07-18T03:34:26Z
dc.date.created2012
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/119283
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this paper is to provide a contemporary overview of the changing size and composition of the Indigenous population. The paper is structured around six key demographic and geographic features of the Indigenous population: Age structure: The Indigenous population is relatively young; Population change: The Indigenous population is increasing at a much faster rate than the non-Indigenous population; Structural ageing: The Indigenous population is ageing and projected to age even faster over the next few decades; Mobility: Indigenous Australians are more likely to be away from their place of usual residence at a given point in time and more likely to change their place of usual residence over a given time period; Geography: The Indigenous population is much more likely to live in remote and very remote Australia relative to the non-Indigenous population but, in absolute terms, most Indigenous Australians live in urban or regional parts of the country; and Urbanisation: The Indigenous population is becoming more urban and this pattern is likely to continue over the next few decades. In the final section of the paper, some of the demographic, policy and socioeconomic impacts of the changing Indigenous population are discussed.
dc.description.sponsorshipThe analysis in the series was funded by the Commonwealth Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs (FaHCSIA) through the Strategic Research Project as well as FaHCSIA and State/Territory governments through the Indigenous Populations Project.
dc.format.extent28 pages
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherCanberra, ACT : Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research (CAEPR), The Australian National University
dc.relation.ispartofseries2011 Census Paper (Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research (CAEPR), The Australian National University); No. 05/2012
dc.rightsAuthor/s retain copyright
dc.source.urihttp://caepr.anu.edu.au/Publications/census-papers/2012CP5.php
dc.subjectCensus
dc.subjectIndigenous Demographic Trends
dc.titlePopulation and Age Structure
dc.typeWorking/Technical Paper
local.description.notesIn July 2012, the Australian Bureau of Statistics began releasing data from the 2011 Census of Population and Housing. One of the more important results contained in the release was the fact that the number of people who identified as being Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander (Indigenous) had increased by 20.5 per cent since the 2006 Census. There were also significant changes in the characteristics of the Indigenous population across a number of key variables like language spoken at home, housing, education and other socioeconomic variables. In this series, authors from the Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research (CAEPR) document the changing composition and distribution of a range of Indigenous outcomes.
local.identifier.absfor169902 - Studies of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Society
local.publisher.urlhttp://caepr.anu.edu.au/publications/censuspapers.php
local.type.statusPublished Version
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
dc.provenanceIndigenous Population Project
dc.provenancePermission to deposit in Open Research received from CAEPR (ERMS2230079)
CollectionsANU Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research (CAEPR)

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