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Shape vision in bees: innate preference for flower-like patterns

Lehrer, M.; Horridge, George Adrian; Zhang, S. W.; Gadagkar, R.

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The bees' spontaneous preferences toward various black-and-white patterns were studied using a multiple-choice test procedure. The patterns are presented on vertical planes, and the bees' choices at a fixed distance from the patterns are recorded. To exclude a possible influence of the bees' previous experience with natural flowers, the bees are trained to randomized checkerboard patterns prior to testing them with sets of other patterns. We find that, when the test...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorLehrer, M.
dc.contributor.authorHorridge, George Adrian
dc.contributor.authorZhang, S. W.
dc.contributor.authorGadagkar, R.
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-14T03:04:56Z
dc.identifier.issn0962-8436
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/117351
dc.description.abstractThe bees' spontaneous preferences toward various black-and-white patterns were studied using a multiple-choice test procedure. The patterns are presented on vertical planes, and the bees' choices at a fixed distance from the patterns are recorded. To exclude a possible influence of the bees' previous experience with natural flowers, the bees are trained to randomized checkerboard patterns prior to testing them with sets of other patterns. We find that, when the test patterns are of the same kind, but differ in their spatial frequencies, the bees prefer low over high frequencies. However, when the patterns differ in type, the bees express, regardless of spatial frequency, a positive preference for patterns containing radiating elements, and a negative preference for patterns containing circular elements or elements arranged at random. We find, in addition, that symmetrical patterns are more attractive than less symmetrical or non-symmetrical patterns. We propose that bees respond innately to some features of natural flowers, resulting in a spontaneous preference for radiating, as well as symmetrical patterns.
dc.description.sponsorshipThe study was partly supported by funds from the Fujitsu Corporation of Japan to Adrian Horridge and Manclyam Srinivasan, and an Australian Commonwealth Science and Technology Grant for Bilateral Collaboration to Mandyam Srinivasan.
dc.format15 pages
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.publisherThe Royal Society
dc.rights© 1995 The Royal Society
dc.sourcePhilosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
dc.subjectbees
dc.subjectpreferences
dc.subjectblack-and-white
dc.subjectpatterns
dc.subjectmultiple-choice
dc.subjecttest
dc.titleShape vision in bees: innate preference for flower-like patterns
dc.typeJournal article
local.identifier.citationvolume347
dcterms.dateAccepted1994-08-12
dc.date.issued1995
local.publisher.urlhttps://royalsociety.org/
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationHorridge, George Adrian, Division of Biomedical Science and Biochemistry, CMBE Research School of Biology, The Australian National University
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.identifier.essn1471-2970
local.bibliographicCitation.issue1320
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage123
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage137
local.identifier.doi10.1098/rstb.1995.0017
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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