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What happens next? Imaginative presence in Gary Peacock and Lee Konitz: Divergent fields, audiation, and the unexpected

Robertson, Benjamin Ian Roderick

Description

Bassist Gary Peacock champions an intuitive aesthetic, whether improvising over standard or free jazz forms. Saxophonist Lee Konitz utilises a similarly fearless approach, improvising melodic ideas that are conceived in the moment. This can be an elusive goal for improvisers, and so this research compares the approaches of these two improvisers via transcription and analysis, and the employment of their methods in my own creative practice. In synthesising the...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorRobertson, Benjamin Ian Roderick
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-05T01:56:12Z
dc.date.available2017-06-05T01:56:12Z
dc.identifier.otherb44883754
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/117208
dc.description.abstractBassist Gary Peacock champions an intuitive aesthetic, whether improvising over standard or free jazz forms. Saxophonist Lee Konitz utilises a similarly fearless approach, improvising melodic ideas that are conceived in the moment. This can be an elusive goal for improvisers, and so this research compares the approaches of these two improvisers via transcription and analysis, and the employment of their methods in my own creative practice. In synthesising the key ideas of the two case studies, the research then presents a theory of improvising possibility, called the divergent field. This identifies a type of indeterminacy that can be used as the engine for change in the process of improvising. The divergent field describes musically ambiguous states that leave ‘what happens next’ as being up to the improviser. This aspect is examined in a creative component, Unanchored Music, An Improvising Journal 2013-16, a CD which accompanies the written exegesis and is a record of my own improvising as double bassist with several ensembles, exploring my own creative practice resulting from the writing. My improvising is informed by the jazz tradition in a creative method that involves daily practice, aural training and the study of ideas that populate my musical imagination. This has allowed me to absorb and apply aspects of this research into my own improvising, as it is motivated by a desire to discover the process that Konitz and Peacock are using while improvising, rather than imitate the final products they create. It is hoped that by focusing on this less explored aspect of the field, this thesis will contribute to improving the ongoing dialogue between player and researcher.
dc.language.isoen
dc.subjectImprovisation
dc.subjectDouble Bass
dc.subjectSaxophone
dc.subjectLee Konitz
dc.subjectGary Peacock
dc.subjectEmergence
dc.subjectBen Robertson
dc.subjectJazz
dc.subjectJohn Cage
dc.titleWhat happens next? Imaginative presence in Gary Peacock and Lee Konitz: Divergent fields, audiation, and the unexpected
dc.typeThesis (MPhil)
local.contributor.supervisorBowan, Kate
local.contributor.supervisorcontactkate.bowan@anu.edu.au
dcterms.valid2017
local.description.notesThe author deposited 10/04/17
local.type.degreeMaster of Philosophy (MPhil)
dc.date.issued2016
local.contributor.affiliationMusic Department, School of Arts and Social Sciences, The Australian National University
local.identifier.doi10.25911/5d74e56ebceef
local.mintdoimint
CollectionsOpen Access Theses

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File Description SizeFormat Image
Robertson Thesis 2016.pdf10.98 MBAdobe PDFThumbnail
Robertson tracks1-39 accompanying to chapters one and two.zip6.8 kBUnknown
Robertson_Unanchored Music.zip1.41 kBUnknown


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