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Climate change, noncommunicable diseases, and development: the relationships and common policy opportunities

Friel, Sharon; Bowen, K; Campbell-Lendrum, D; Frumkin, H; McMichael, A. J; Rasanathan, K

Description

The rapid growth in noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), including injury and poor mental health, in low- and middle-income countries and the widening social gradients in NCDs within most countries worldwide pose major challenges to health and social systems and to development more generally. As Earth’s surface temperature rises, a consequence of human-induced climate change, incidences of severe heat waves, droughts, storms, and floods will increase and become more severe. These changes will...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorFriel, Sharon
dc.contributor.authorBowen, K
dc.contributor.authorCampbell-Lendrum, D
dc.contributor.authorFrumkin, H
dc.contributor.authorMcMichael, A. J
dc.contributor.authorRasanathan, K
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-23T05:30:22Z
dc.date.available2014-05-23T05:30:22Z
dc.identifier.issn0163-7525
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/11708
dc.description.abstractThe rapid growth in noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), including injury and poor mental health, in low- and middle-income countries and the widening social gradients in NCDs within most countries worldwide pose major challenges to health and social systems and to development more generally. As Earth’s surface temperature rises, a consequence of human-induced climate change, incidences of severe heat waves, droughts, storms, and floods will increase and become more severe. These changes will bring heightened risks to human survival and will likely exacerbate the incidence of some NCDs, including cardiovascular disease, some cancers, respiratory health, mental disorders, injuries, and malnutrition. These two great and urgent contemporary human challenges—to improve global health, especially the control of NCDs, and to protect people from the effects of climate change—would benefit from alignment of their policy agendas, offering synergistic opportunities to improve population and planetary health. Well-designed climate change policy can reduce the incidence of major NCDs in local populations.
dc.description.sponsorshipFinancial support for research assistance (by K.B.) in the preparation of this manuscript was provided by the Non-Communicable Disease and Mental Health Cluster, World Health Organisation, Geneva.
dc.format15 pages
dc.publisherAnnual Reviews
dc.rights©2011 by Annual Reviews
dc.sourceAnnual Review of Public Health 32 (2011): 133- 147
dc.subjecthealth
dc.subjectinequities
dc.subjectmitigation
dc.subjectadaptation
dc.subjectcobenefits
dc.titleClimate change, noncommunicable diseases, and development: the relationships and common policy opportunities
dc.typeJournal article
local.identifier.citationvolume32
dc.date.issued2011
local.identifier.absfor160508 - Health Policy
local.identifier.absfor111706 - Epidemiology
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4468094xPUB138
local.publisher.urlhttp://www.annualreviews.org
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationFriel, S, National Center for Epidemiology and Population Health, The Australian National University
local.contributor.affiliationMcMichael, A. J, National Center for Epidemiology and Population Health, The Australian National University
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/ft0991462
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage14.1
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage4.15
local.identifier.doi10.1146/annurev-publhealth-071910-140612
dc.date.updated2015-12-08T10:25:21Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-79952855108
local.identifier.thomsonID000290776200008
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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