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Dangerous harvest : investigations in the late prehistoric occupation of upland south-east central Queensland

Beaton, John M.

Description

This thesis reports on archaeological fieldwork carried out between 1973 and 1975 in the southern part of the Great Dividing Range in Queensland, Australia. Fieldwork consisted of an areal .reconnaissance, sample excavations at three rocksheiter sites, and collection of surface artefacts at one open site. The findings include stone tools, bone tools, faunal and plant remains. Excavations and analyses have shown a marked intensification of Aboriginal use of the region beginning about 4000...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorBeaton, John M.
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-15T05:38:45Z
dc.date.available2017-05-15T05:38:45Z
dc.date.copyright1977
dc.identifier.otherb1174724
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/116900
dc.description.abstractThis thesis reports on archaeological fieldwork carried out between 1973 and 1975 in the southern part of the Great Dividing Range in Queensland, Australia. Fieldwork consisted of an areal .reconnaissance, sample excavations at three rocksheiter sites, and collection of surface artefacts at one open site. The findings include stone tools, bone tools, faunal and plant remains. Excavations and analyses have shown a marked intensification of Aboriginal use of the region beginning about 4000 to 5000 years ago. The increase in occupation is associated with the introduction of a new and distinctive stone tool technology. The rocksheiter excavations also showed that seeds of the cycad, Macrozanria moorei, were the most important food used at the sites, as evidenced by their remains in the shelter deposits. The cycads are known to be highly toxic and potentially carcinogenic to all mammals that have been given the plant material or extracts experimentally. The Aborigines of prehistoric Queensland eliminated the poison, probably by leaching the crushed seeds in water, although other methods may have been used. The natural history, human use and other features of cycads are discussed in light of modem issues in medical and anthropological research concerning these plants. It is proposed that the use of cycads in the Queensland uplands, and possibly elsewhere in Australia, had important implications for prehistoric social integration.
dc.format.extent1v
dc.language.isoen
dc.subject.lcshAboriginal Australians Antiquities
dc.subject.lcshCycadaceae
dc.subject.lcshQueensland Antiquities
dc.titleDangerous harvest : investigations in the late prehistoric occupation of upland south-east central Queensland
dc.typeThesis (PhD)
local.contributor.supervisorO'Connell, James F.
local.contributor.supervisorJones, Rhys
dcterms.valid1977
local.description.notesThis thesis has been made available through exception 200AB to the Copyright Act.
local.type.degreeDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)
dc.date.issued1977
local.contributor.affiliationDepartment of Prehistory, Research School of Pacific Studies, The Australian National University
local.identifier.doi10.25911/5d73956341e8a
dc.date.updated2017-05-12T01:18:21Z
local.mintdoimint
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