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Moderate influenza vaccine effectiveness in Victoria, Australia, 2011

Fielding, J E; Grant, K A; Tran, T; Kelly, H A

Description

We used a sentinel general practitioner (GP) network to conduct surveillance for laboratory-confirmed influenza amongst patients presenting with influenza-like illness (ILI) in Victoria, Australia in 2011. The test-negative variation of the case control study design was used to estimate effectiveness for seasonal trivalent influenza vaccine. Cases and controls were ILI patients that tested positive and negative for influenza, respectively. Vaccination status was recorded by GPs and vaccine...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorFielding, J E
dc.contributor.authorGrant, K A
dc.contributor.authorTran, T
dc.contributor.authorKelly, H A
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-27T01:50:13Z
dc.date.available2014-03-27T01:50:13Z
dc.identifier.issn1560-7917
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/11491
dc.description.abstractWe used a sentinel general practitioner (GP) network to conduct surveillance for laboratory-confirmed influenza amongst patients presenting with influenza-like illness (ILI) in Victoria, Australia in 2011. The test-negative variation of the case control study design was used to estimate effectiveness for seasonal trivalent influenza vaccine. Cases and controls were ILI patients that tested positive and negative for influenza, respectively. Vaccination status was recorded by GPs and vaccine effectiveness (VE) was calculated as (1-adjusted odds ratio)x100%. There were 529 patients included in the study, of which 29% were influenza-positive. Twelve percent of study participants were reported as vaccinated, 6% of cases and 15% of controls. Adjusted VE against all influenza was 56%, but not statistically significant. There was generally little variation in VE estimates when stratified by virus type and subtype, which is consistent with good matches between circulating strains and the vaccine strains. The VE was higher among adults of working age than among children.
dc.format5 pages
dc.publisherEuropean Centre for Disease Prevention and Control
dc.rightsEmail permission 3/12/13 from editor, Eurosurveillance.
dc.sourceEurosurveillance 17.11 (2012): pii=20115
dc.source.urihttp://www.eurosurveillance.org/ViewArticle.aspx?ArticleId=20115
dc.subjectmoderate
dc.subjectinfluenza
dc.subjectvaccine
dc.subjecteffectiveness
dc.subjectVictoria
dc.subjectAustralia
dc.titleModerate influenza vaccine effectiveness in Victoria, Australia, 2011
dc.typeJournal article
local.identifier.citationvolume17
dc.date.issued2012-03-15
local.identifier.absfor110203 - Respiratory Diseases
local.identifier.ariespublicationf5625xPUB1498
local.publisher.urlhttp://www.ecdc.europa.eu/en/Pages/home.aspx
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationFielding, J E, National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health, The Australian National University
local.contributor.affiliationKelly, H A, National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health, The Australian National University
local.bibliographicCitation.issue11
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage5
local.identifier.absseo920115 - Respiratory System and Diseases (incl. Asthma)
dc.date.updated2015-12-10T10:58:22Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84858781684
local.identifier.thomsonID000299130000007
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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