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The economic and social benefits of increasing Indigenous employment

Gray, Matthew; Hunter, Boyd; Biddle, Nicholas

Description

Relatively low rates of employment are one of the reasons for many of the poor economic and social outcomes experienced by Indigenous Australians. Increases in the rate of Indigenous employment would result in significant economic gains to the individuals who move into employment, and their families and communities, to the government who would receive higher tax revenues and have lower social security outlays, and the economy as a whole via the increases in the effective labour supply....[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorGray, Matthew
dc.contributor.authorHunter, Boyd
dc.contributor.authorBiddle, Nicholas
dc.contributor.otherAustralian National University. Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research
dc.coverage.spatialAustralia
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-28T04:49:43Z
dc.date.available2017-03-28T04:49:43Z
dc.date.created2014
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/114086
dc.description.abstractRelatively low rates of employment are one of the reasons for many of the poor economic and social outcomes experienced by Indigenous Australians. Increases in the rate of Indigenous employment would result in significant economic gains to the individuals who move into employment, and their families and communities, to the government who would receive higher tax revenues and have lower social security outlays, and the economy as a whole via the increases in the effective labour supply. The existing research also finds that there are health and social benefits that flow from paid employment (e.g. Biddle 2011; Hunter & Gray 2013). This paper, using the latest available data and research, provides estimates of the likely economic and social benefits of increasing Indigenous employment to the same level as in the non-Indigenous population (i.e. closing the employment gap).
dc.format.extent16 pages
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherCanberra, ACT : Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research (CAEPR), The Australian National University
dc.relation.ispartofseriesTopical Issue (Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research (CAEPR), The Australian National University); No. 1/2014
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCAEPR Topical Issue; No. 1/2014
dc.rightsAuthor/s retain copyright
dc.source.urihttp://caepr.anu.edu.au/sites/default/files/Publications/topical/Topical_Issue_01-2014_GrayHunterBiddle_EconomicSocialBenefitsIndigenousEmployment.pdf
dc.titleThe economic and social benefits of increasing Indigenous employment
dc.typeWorking/Technical Paper
local.description.notesThe views expressed in this paper are those of the authors and may not reflect those of the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet or the Australian Government. Research assistance was provided by Monica Howlett. The authors are grateful to Andrew Podger, John Taylor and Mandy Yap for comments on an earlier version of this paper.
local.identifier.absfor169902 - Studies of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Society
local.publisher.urlhttp://caepr.anu.edu.au/
local.type.statusPublished Version
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
dc.provenancePermission to deposit in Open Research received from CAEPR (ERMS2230079)
CollectionsANU Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research (CAEPR)

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