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'The Bolshevik element must be stamped out' : returned soldiers and Queensland politics, 1918-1925

Popple, Jeff

Description

The First World War was not a unifying experience for Australian society. The demands and traumas produced by the war played on and exacerbated long existing tensions and divisions in Australian society. The descent from a facade of near unanimity of purpose at the beginning of the war to the open and bitter racial, religious and class confrontations at its end is now well documented. Marilyn Lake and Raymond Evans have provided accounts of the impact of the war upon the homefront in...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorPopple, Jeff
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-24T03:59:23Z
dc.date.available2017-03-24T03:59:23Z
dc.date.copyright1988
dc.identifier.otherb1705394
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/113874
dc.description.abstractThe First World War was not a unifying experience for Australian society. The demands and traumas produced by the war played on and exacerbated long existing tensions and divisions in Australian society. The descent from a facade of near unanimity of purpose at the beginning of the war to the open and bitter racial, religious and class confrontations at its end is now well documented. Marilyn Lake and Raymond Evans have provided accounts of the impact of the war upon the homefront in Tasmania and Queensland between 1914 and 1918, while L.L. Robson in his excellent study has charted the decline of unity by focussing on responses to one issue, enlistment.(2) Other historians have also provided sweeping accounts or narrow specialist studies which chronicle the degree of disunity and social conflict during the war years.(3) Heated industrial disputes, falling wages and rising prices and two emotive conscription referenda all helped to aggravate and extend the societal divisions caused by religious suspicions, racial persecution and class conflict over the inequality of wartime sacrifices. These divisions were deepened by two overseas events; Britain’s brutal suppression of the Irish Easter rebellion, and the Bolshevik revolution in Russia. As a result of the trauma of war Australian society in 1918 was a cauldron of turmoil into which one more divisive ingredient was yet to be added, the returned soldier.
dc.format.extentv, 278 leaves
dc.language.isoen
dc.subject.lcshReturned Services League of Australia History
dc.subject.lcshCommunism HistoryAustralia Queensland
dc.subject.lcshPressure groups HistoryAustralia
dc.subject.lcshQueensland Politics and government 1901-1945
dc.title'The Bolshevik element must be stamped out' : returned soldiers and Queensland politics, 1918-1925
dc.typeThesis (Masters)
local.contributor.supervisorKent, Bruce
dcterms.valid1988
local.description.notesThis thesis has been made available through exception 200AB to the Copyright Act.
local.type.degreeOther
dc.date.issued1988
local.contributor.affiliationThe Australian National University
local.identifier.doi10.25911/5d74e620478fa
dc.date.updated2017-03-24T00:32:56Z
local.mintdoimint
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