Skip navigation
Skip navigation

Writing through the labyrinth: Using l’ecriture feminine in leadership studies

Lipton, Briony

Description

Metaphors enable us to understand organisations in distinctive ways and explain the paucity of women in leadership positions, and yet, when gender discrimination is addressed via metaphor, women’s responses, resistance and agency are rarely included in such analyses. In this article, I employ a narrative writing practice inspired by the work of He´le`ne Cixous as a way of exploring how we might research and write differently in leadership studies. Cixous invites women to reclaim their...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorLipton, Briony
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-14T03:42:23Z
dc.date.available2017-03-14T03:42:23Z
dc.identifier.issn1742-7150
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/113155
dc.description.abstractMetaphors enable us to understand organisations in distinctive ways and explain the paucity of women in leadership positions, and yet, when gender discrimination is addressed via metaphor, women’s responses, resistance and agency are rarely included in such analyses. In this article, I employ a narrative writing practice inspired by the work of He´le`ne Cixous as a way of exploring how we might research and write differently in leadership studies. Cixous invites women to reclaim their sexuality and subjectivity through a feminine mode of women’s writing and what she defines as l’ecriture feminine can be interpreted as a liberating bodily practice that aims to release women’s repressed creative agency and transform phallogocentric structures. Using the Greek mythology of the Minotaur and the Labyrinth, this article weaves together these seemingly disparate concepts of myth, metaphor and feminist writing practices with leadership discourse to explore the ways in which academic women experience the university organisation as a labyrinth, how they navigate pathways to promotion and practice leadership. This creative analytic operates as a metanarrative that offers new ways of researching and writing leadership studies from the body, and reveals how myths continue to influence present experiences and structures in unexpected ways.
dc.format17 pages
dc.publisherSAGE Publications (UK and US)
dc.rights© SAGE
dc.sourceLeadership
dc.subjectacademic women
dc.subjectleadership
dc.subjectCixous
dc.subjectl’ecriture feminine
dc.subjectmetaphor
dc.titleWriting through the labyrinth: Using l’ecriture feminine in leadership studies
dc.typeJournal article
local.identifier.citationvolume13
dc.date.issued2015-12-09
local.publisher.urlhttps://au.sagepub.com/
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationLipton, Briony, School of Sociology, CASS Research School of Social Sciences, The Australian National University
local.identifier.essn1742-7169
local.bibliographicCitation.issue1
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage64
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage80
local.identifier.doi10.1177/1742715015619969
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
CollectionsANU Research Publications

Download

There are no files associated with this item.


Items in Open Research are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Updated:  20 July 2017/ Responsible Officer:  University Librarian/ Page Contact:  Library Systems & Web Coordinator