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Association of genetic risk factors with cognitive decline: the PATH through life project

Andrews, Shea J.; Das, Debjani; Cherbuin, Nic; Easteal, Simon; Anstey, Kaarin

Description

We examined the association of 28 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), previously associated with dementia or cognitive performance, with tests assessing episodic memory, working memory, vocabulary, and perceptual speed in 1689 nondemented older Australians of European ancestry. In addition to testing each variant individually, we assessed the collective association of the 12-risk SNPs for late-onset Alzheimer's disease using weighted and unweighted genetic risk scores. Significant...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorAndrews, Shea J.
dc.contributor.authorDas, Debjani
dc.contributor.authorCherbuin, Nic
dc.contributor.authorEasteal, Simon
dc.contributor.authorAnstey, Kaarin
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-21T23:53:21Z
dc.date.available2017-02-21T23:53:21Z
dc.identifier.issn0197-4580
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/112496
dc.description.abstractWe examined the association of 28 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), previously associated with dementia or cognitive performance, with tests assessing episodic memory, working memory, vocabulary, and perceptual speed in 1689 nondemented older Australians of European ancestry. In addition to testing each variant individually, we assessed the collective association of the 12-risk SNPs for late-onset Alzheimer's disease using weighted and unweighted genetic risk scores. Significant associations with cognitive performance were observed for APOE ε4 allele, ABCA7-rs3764650, CR1-rs3818361, MS4A4E-rs6109332, BDNF-rs6265, COMT-rs4680, CTNNBL-rs6125962, FRMD4A-rs17314229, FRMD4A-rs17314229, intergenic SNP chrX-rs12007229, PDE7A-rs10808746, SORL1-rs668387, and ZNF224-rs3746319. In addition, the weighted genetic risk score was associated with worse performance on episodic memory. The identification of genetic risk factors, that act individually or collectively, may help in screening for people with elevated risk of cognitive decline and for understanding the biological pathways that underlie cognitive decline.
dc.description.sponsorshipThe study was supported by the Dementia Collaborative Research Center – Early Diagnosis and Prevention (DCRC-EDP) which is funded by the NHMRC and the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) grants 973302, 179805, 1002160. Debjani Das is funded by NHMRC Project grant no. 1043256. Nicolas Cherbuin is funded by Research Fellowship No. 12010227. Kaarin J. Anstey is funded by NHMRC Research Fellowship No. 1102694.
dc.format9 pages
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.rights© 2016 Elsevier Inc
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.sourceNeurobiology of Aging
dc.subjectAlzheimer's disease
dc.subjectCognitive decline
dc.subjectSNPs
dc.subjectGenetic risk scores
dc.subjectPopulation-based study
dc.titleAssociation of genetic risk factors with cognitive decline: the PATH through life project
dc.typeJournal article
local.identifier.citationvolume41
dcterms.dateAccepted2016-02-13
dc.date.issued2016-05
local.publisher.urlhttps://www.elsevier.com/
local.type.statusAccepted Version
local.contributor.affiliationShea Andrews: Department of Genome Sciences, John Curtin School of Medical Research, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT Australia
local.contributor.affiliationDebjani Das: Department of Genome Sciences, John Curtin School of Medical Research, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT Australia
local.contributor.affiliationNic Cherbuin: Centre for Research on Ageing, Health & Wellbeing, Research School of Population Health, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT Australia
local.contributor.affiliationKaarin Anstey: Centre for Research on Ageing, Health & Wellbeing, Research School of Population Health, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT Australia
local.contributor.affiliationSimon Easteal: Department of Genome Sciences, John Curtin School of Medical Research, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT Australia
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/NHMRC/973302
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/NHMRC/179805
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/NHMRC/1002160
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/NHMRC/1043256
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/NHMRC/12010227
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/NHMRC/1102694
local.identifier.essn1558-1497
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage150
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage158
local.identifier.doi10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2016.02.016
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
dc.provenancehttp://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/issn/0197-4580/..."author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing)Permitted deposit due to Funding Body, Institutional and Governmental policy or mandate, may be required to comply with embargo period of 12 months"(Sherpa/Romeo as of 22/2/2017)
dc.rights.licenseCreative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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