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Women's subordination as a social process : the Walbiri of central Australia

Hendershott, Barbara Kay

Description

In a given cultural context, a woman's relationship to a man may be perceived as "second class", "junior partner" or "partner". Regardless of a woman's status and how it is defined in relation to a man's. both men and women are expected to fulfill different social roles. Within some relatively egalitarian societies all men may be considered to be essentially equal, as well as all women. However, men and women as two separate groups may have different rights and obligations which may make them...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorHendershott, Barbara Kay
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-21T01:12:59Z
dc.date.available2017-02-21T01:12:59Z
dc.date.copyright1978
dc.identifier.otherb1318802
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/112485
dc.description.abstractIn a given cultural context, a woman's relationship to a man may be perceived as "second class", "junior partner" or "partner". Regardless of a woman's status and how it is defined in relation to a man's. both men and women are expected to fulfill different social roles. Within some relatively egalitarian societies all men may be considered to be essentially equal, as well as all women. However, men and women as two separate groups may have different rights and obligations which may make them unequal. In such societies the anthropologist may perceive that in many social arenas women are coincidental, whilst men are the main cultural actors. Yet this observation cannot be rejected solely as androcentric bias. It is apparent that in some societies, according to male actors, women are considered as socially unequal. Women, as a whole, may not have the mobility of men nor access to social support systems enabling them to attain power.
dc.format.extentii, 78 leaves
dc.language.isoen
dc.subject.lcshWarlpiri (Australian people) Social conditions
dc.subject.lcshWomen, Aboriginal Australian Social conditions
dc.titleWomen's subordination as a social process : the Walbiri of central Australia
dc.typeThesis (Masters)
local.contributor.supervisorIfeka, Caroline
dcterms.valid1978
local.description.notesThis thesis has been made available through exception 200AB to the Copyright Act.
local.type.degreeMaster by research (Masters)
dc.date.issued1978
local.contributor.affiliationDepartment of Prehistory and Anthropology, School of General Studies
local.identifier.doi10.25911/5d74e807c5b9b
dc.date.updated2017-02-21T00:01:32Z
local.mintdoimint
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