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Two sides of the coin. Part 1. Lipid and surfactant self-assembly revisited

Ninham, Barry W; Larsson, Kåre; Lo Nostro, Pierandrea

Description

Hofmeister, specific ion effects, hydration and van der Waals forces at and between interfaces are factors that determine curvature and microstructure in self assembled aggregates of surfactants and lipids; and in microemulsions. Lipid and surfactant head group interactions and between aggregates vary enormously and are highly specific. They act on the hydrophilic side of a bilayer, micelle or other self assembled aggregate. It is only over the last three decades that the origin of Hofmeister...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorNinham, Barry W
dc.contributor.authorLarsson, Kåre
dc.contributor.authorLo Nostro, Pierandrea
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-16T04:30:44Z
dc.date.available2017-02-16T04:30:44Z
dc.identifier.issn0927-7765
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/112399
dc.description.abstractHofmeister, specific ion effects, hydration and van der Waals forces at and between interfaces are factors that determine curvature and microstructure in self assembled aggregates of surfactants and lipids; and in microemulsions. Lipid and surfactant head group interactions and between aggregates vary enormously and are highly specific. They act on the hydrophilic side of a bilayer, micelle or other self assembled aggregate. It is only over the last three decades that the origin of Hofmeister effects has become generally understood. Knowledge of their systematics now provides much flexibility in designing nanostructured fluids. The other side of the coin involves equally specific forces. These (opposing) forces work on the hydrophobic side of amphiphilic interfaces. They are due to the interaction of hydrocarbons and other "oils" with hydrophobic tails of surfactants and lipids. The specificity of oleophilic solutes in microemulsions and lipid membranes provides a counterpoint to Hofmeister effects and hydration. Together with global packing constraints these effects determine microstructure. Another factor that has hardly been recognised is the role of dissolved gas. This introduces further, qualitative changes in forces that prescribe microstructure. The systematics of these effects and their interplay are elucidated. Awareness of these competing factors facilitates formulation of self assembled nanostructured fluids. New and predictable geometries that emerge naturally provide insights into a variety of biological phenomena like anaesthetic and pheromone action and transmission of the nervous impulse (see Part 2).
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.rights© 2017 Elsevier B.V.
dc.sourceColloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces
dc.subjectcurvature
dc.subjecthydration
dc.subjectlipid(s)
dc.subjectmolecular forces
dc.subjectpacking
dc.subjectself-assembly
dc.subjectspecificity
dc.subjectsurfactant(s)
dc.titleTwo sides of the coin. Part 1. Lipid and surfactant self-assembly revisited
dc.typeJournal article
local.identifier.citationvolume152
dc.date.issued2017-01-15
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationNinham, B. W., Department of Applied Mathematics, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, The Australian National University
local.identifier.essn1873-4367
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage326
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage338
local.identifier.doi10.1016/j.colsurfb.2017.01.022
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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