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The Indianised culture of north-western Malaya (West Malaysia)

Rajah, Nirmala

Description

In most works on the Indianisation of South-east Asia, Malaya is briefly discussed with the mention of a few inscriptions and sculptures, cited as evidence for an early Indian cultural influence over the area. This is perhaps due to the fact that until recently, most of the research in this field, was conducted by either French or Dutch scholars. The emphasis was, therefore, given to Indo-China or Indonesia, where the political position was such that these scholars had easy access to...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorRajah, Nirmala
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-08T01:37:18Z
dc.date.available2016-12-08T01:37:18Z
dc.date.copyright1973
dc.identifier.otherb1292605
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/111320
dc.description.abstractIn most works on the Indianisation of South-east Asia, Malaya is briefly discussed with the mention of a few inscriptions and sculptures, cited as evidence for an early Indian cultural influence over the area. This is perhaps due to the fact that until recently, most of the research in this field, was conducted by either French or Dutch scholars. The emphasis was, therefore, given to Indo-China or Indonesia, where the political position was such that these scholars had easy access to sites and relevant data. Besides this, the architectural and sculptural remains in Malaya are far less spectacular. As Wheatley so aptly put it, ”....... the Peninsula, lacking an Angkor or a Borobodur, has until recently failed to attract the attention of historians" The present day Malay culture contains an Indian element. This is especially discernable in Malay rituals and various art forms such as dance, drama and craft works (2). The Indianised civilisation of North-western Malaya, which existed for a few centuries, must have contributed greatly towards this. Furthermore, Malaya's participation in international trade commenced during this period. Malaya's'position mid-way between India and China, and her accessibility from Thailand, Indo-China and the rest of the Malay Archipelago must have made her an important centre on South-east Asian trade routes. A detailed study of this civilisation is, therefore, important not only for a better understanding of a significant period in the history of Malaya, but also that of South-east Asia.
dc.format.extent1 v.
dc.language.isoen
dc.subject.lcshMalay Peninsula Antiquities
dc.subject.lcshMalay Peninsula Civilization
dc.subject.lcshIndia Relations Malay Archipelago
dc.subject.lcshMalay Peninsula Relations India
dc.titleThe Indianised culture of north-western Malaya (West Malaysia)
dc.typeThesis (Masters)
local.contributor.supervisorLoofs, H. H. E.
dcterms.valid1973
local.description.notesThis thesis has been made available through exception 200AB to the Copyright Act.
local.type.degreeMaster by research (Masters)
dc.date.issued1973
local.contributor.affiliationSchool of Asian Studies
local.identifier.doi10.25911/5d7636982858b
dc.date.updated2016-11-25T00:02:42Z
local.mintdoimint
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