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The "Blackfella Way" : ideology and practice in an urban Aboriginal community

Schwab, Robert

Description

This is a study of urban Aboriginal ideology, conducted in Adelaide, South Australia. It addresses the issue of Aboriginal identity and argues that in order to understand the Aboriginal sense of self it is necessary to examine the tension between history, ideas, dispositions and social practice in the context of the objective conditions of daily life. The thesis is that there exists among Aborigines in Adelaide an ideational system they refer to as the "Blackfella Way". An overview of the...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorSchwab, Robert
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-15T01:28:15Z
dc.date.available2016-11-15T01:28:15Z
dc.date.copyright1991
dc.identifier.otherb1799104
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/110284
dc.description.abstractThis is a study of urban Aboriginal ideology, conducted in Adelaide, South Australia. It addresses the issue of Aboriginal identity and argues that in order to understand the Aboriginal sense of self it is necessary to examine the tension between history, ideas, dispositions and social practice in the context of the objective conditions of daily life. The thesis is that there exists among Aborigines in Adelaide an ideational system they refer to as the "Blackfella Way". An overview of the structure and content of the Blackfella Way in terms of its two distinct and complementary dimensions, essence and style, is presented. It is argued that this system is an historical, cognitive and social construction which synthesizes the tone, texture, style, and mood of life and provides a conceptual and practical framework through which individuals formulate, think about &mi act in the world. The process whereby the ideational system is translated into ideology and the structural position of Aborigines in Adelaide reproducer :s also examined. Consideration is given to the ways in which social and ideological formations mediate the influence of external events and forces and shape human practice are explored. It is argued that through the process of symbolic violence, the limitations of the objective conditions become internalized and appropriated. Objective conditions thus inform and frame the ideological system which Aboriginal actors produce, reproduce and which ultimately reproduces the existing imbalance of power.
dc.format.extentix, 243 p
dc.language.isoen
dc.subject.lcshAboriginal Australians Ethnic identity
dc.subject.lcshAboriginal Australians Social life and customs
dc.subject.lcshPhilosophy, Aboriginal Australian
dc.subject.lcshUrban anthropology
dc.subject.lcshStructural anthropology
dc.titleThe "Blackfella Way" : ideology and practice in an urban Aboriginal community
dc.typeThesis (PhD)
local.contributor.supervisorTonkinson, Bob
local.contributor.supervisorPeterson, Nicolas
dcterms.valid1991
local.description.notesThis thesis has been made available through exception 200AB to the Copyright Act.
local.type.degreeDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)
dc.date.issued1991
local.contributor.affiliationDepartment of Prehistory and Anthropology
local.identifier.doi10.25911/5d763a314b3eb
dc.date.updated2016-11-01T00:08:28Z
local.mintdoimint
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