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Text and image in the Salisbury Breviary (Paris, BN ms lat 17294) : the decorative cycle and its Paris precursors

Pearce, Judith M.

Description

The main aim of this thesis is to examine the Salisbury Breviary from the point of view of "the picture in service of text and patron". The breviary is defined as a text. and the Salisbury Breviary identified as an exceptionally richly decorated example of the genre, made in Paris during the second quarter of the fifteenth century, but written for the use of Sarum, and intended for the personal use of the Duke of Bedford, then regent in France for the infant king of England, Henry VI. In...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorPearce, Judith M.
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-06T23:05:38Z
dc.date.available2016-11-06T23:05:38Z
dc.date.copyright1987
dc.identifier.otherb1663009
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/110012
dc.description.abstractThe main aim of this thesis is to examine the Salisbury Breviary from the point of view of "the picture in service of text and patron". The breviary is defined as a text. and the Salisbury Breviary identified as an exceptionally richly decorated example of the genre, made in Paris during the second quarter of the fifteenth century, but written for the use of Sarum, and intended for the personal use of the Duke of Bedford, then regent in France for the infant king of England, Henry VI. In terms of the elements contributing to the hierarchy of decoration of its sanctoral, communal and temporal (the psalter is missing), the Salisbury Breviary is shown to be the culminating example of a well-established tradition in Paris for the decoration and illumination of breviaries, represented by such major precursors as the Breviary of Charles V. the Chateauroux and Orgemont Breviaries, and the Breviary of Jean sans Peur. By contrast, the decorative forms used in the Salisbury Breviary are shown to reflect experiments conducted by the Bedford, Boucicaut and Rohan workshops in luxury books of hours rather than breviaries, in order pictorially to enhance their function as manuscripts for lay devotional use. The use of such devices in the Salisbury Breviary, which resulted in a unique series of visual glosses to the, text of the divine office, is explained with particular reference to the cross-cultural nature of the commission.
dc.format.extent2 v. (x, 342 leaves)
dc.language.isoen
dc.subject.lcshSalisbury breviary
dc.subject.lcshIllumination of books and manuscripts, Medieval France Paris
dc.titleText and image in the Salisbury Breviary (Paris, BN ms lat 17294) : the decorative cycle and its Paris precursors
dc.typeThesis (PhD)
local.contributor.supervisorTillotson, John
dcterms.valid1987
local.description.notesThis thesis has been made available through exception 200AB to the Copyright Act.
local.type.degreeDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)
dc.date.issued1987
local.identifier.doi10.25911/5d76394df238e
dc.date.updated2016-11-01T00:11:47Z
dc.description.tableofcontentsv. 1. Text. -- v. 2. Figures.
local.identifier.proquestYes
local.mintdoimint
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