Skip navigation
Skip navigation

Fleet and Wall: Ming China's strategic options 1392-1449

Hsiao, Hung-Te

Description

This thesis, Fleet and wall: Ming China’s Strategic Options 1392 - 1449, concentrates on four focuses: 1. defence strategies in Chinese history 2 early Ming China’s strategic background 3. the strategic role for Zheng He’s voyages 4. the abandonment of the Ming Fleet and the construction of the Great Wall. It links north and south, war and diplomacies. The first chapter is an introduction. The second chapter is on methodology. Relevant Chinese historical documentations for the Yuan, Ming...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorHsiao, Hung-Te
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-24T00:40:49Z
dc.date.available2016-10-24T00:40:49Z
dc.date.copyright2006
dc.identifier.otherb2279553
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/109371
dc.description.abstractThis thesis, Fleet and wall: Ming China’s Strategic Options 1392 - 1449, concentrates on four focuses: 1. defence strategies in Chinese history 2 early Ming China’s strategic background 3. the strategic role for Zheng He’s voyages 4. the abandonment of the Ming Fleet and the construction of the Great Wall. It links north and south, war and diplomacies. The first chapter is an introduction. The second chapter is on methodology. Relevant Chinese historical documentations for the Yuan, Ming and Qing Dynasties carry implications of Sinocenterism, prejudice and territorialism; and contain the imperial ceremonial language and a confusion between tribute and trade, distorting the real difficult situations for Ming China’s defense strategy. I give an analysis of Ming Shilu and the 23 Dynastic Histories, showing that Asian history (beyond China) from 1405 to 1433 provides the key for Zheng He’s voyages The third chapter discusses north and south - strategy and route (before 1392). There were different land and sea strategies to cope with frontier crisis and maritime contingency. For example, land: constructing the Qing Dynasty Great Wall and alliance with powers in central Asia for destroying Xiongnu. Sea: The Yuan’s wars on Japan and Java. Besides, there was a long history of traffic to the west by land and sea. The fourth chapter is on diplomacy and military elements in the response to Ming China’s crisis (1392-1404). This is an analysis of the strategic background and the interaction of three empires: the Timur Empire, the Mongol Empire and the Ming Empire. Particularly, the Timur Empire is often neglected by historians. It was a great lost empire, its territory had changed a lot in history. Few historians are familiar with this empire. However during Zheng He’s voyages 1405-1433 it was a major power in the world. The fifth chapter is on north desert wars and west ocean voyages (1405-1419). Emperor Yongle’s five great expeditions and Zheng He’s impressive voyages were spectacular events of the same period. Zheng He’s voyage very probably involved a strategic role. The sixth chapter is from advance to defense - from the move of the capital to the last voyage (1420-1434). Many significant events for the Ming Empire are linked in my analysis. The various sources show Hormuz as chief destination for Zheng He’s voyages. However according to Iranian history, Hormuz belonged to the Timur Empire during Zheng He’s voyage 1405-1433, my conclusion is that Zheng He's fleet's visit to Hormuz was to visit the Timur Empire. The seventh chapter is on how the Great Wall replaced the Imperial Fleet (1435-1449). After the Mongol powers were reunited in 1434, the Ming government gradually changed i t s strategy - the great Ming f leet was abandoned and the colossal Great Wall was constructed. The eighth chapter is conclusion.
dc.format.extentv. (various pagings)
dc.language.isoen
dc.subject.lccDS738.H75 2006
dc.subject.lcshTimurids History
dc.subject.lcshChina History Ming dynasty, 1368-1644
dc.subject.lcshChina Defenses
dc.subject.lcshChina Military policy
dc.subject.lcshMongolia History
dc.titleFleet and Wall: Ming China's strategic options 1392-1449
dc.typeThesis (PhD)
local.contributor.supervisorJeffcott, Colin Alexander
dcterms.valid2006
local.description.notesThis thesis has been made available through exception 200AB to the Copyright Act.
local.type.degreeDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)
dc.date.issued2006
local.identifier.doi10.25911/5d77884fdd38b
dc.date.updated2016-10-11T00:05:00Z
local.mintdoimint
CollectionsOpen Access Theses

Download

File Description SizeFormat Image
b22795534-8674-hung-te.pdf263.22 MBAdobe PDFThumbnail


Items in Open Research are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Updated:  19 May 2020/ Responsible Officer:  University Librarian/ Page Contact:  Library Systems & Web Coordinator