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The contribution of community wisdom to conservation ecology

Predavec, Martin; Lunney, Daniel; Hope, Ben; Stalenberg, Eleanor; Shannon, Ian; Crowther, Mathew S; Miller, Indrie

Description

Scientists have traditionally collected data on whether a population is increasing, decreasing, or staying the same, but such studies are often limited by geographic scale and time frame. This means that for many species, understanding of trends comes from only part of their ranges at particular periods. Working with citizen scientists has the potential to overcome these limits. Citizen science has the added benefit of exposing citizens to the scientific process and engaging them in management...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorPredavec, Martin
dc.contributor.authorLunney, Daniel
dc.contributor.authorHope, Ben
dc.contributor.authorStalenberg, Eleanor
dc.contributor.authorShannon, Ian
dc.contributor.authorCrowther, Mathew S
dc.contributor.authorMiller, Indrie
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-05T04:27:12Z
dc.date.available2016-10-05T04:27:12Z
dc.identifier.issn0888-8892
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/109159
dc.description.abstractScientists have traditionally collected data on whether a population is increasing, decreasing, or staying the same, but such studies are often limited by geographic scale and time frame. This means that for many species, understanding of trends comes from only part of their ranges at particular periods. Working with citizen scientists has the potential to overcome these limits. Citizen science has the added benefit of exposing citizens to the scientific process and engaging them in management outcomes. We examined a different way of using citizen scientists (instead of data collection). We asked community members to answer a question directly and thus examined whether community wisdom can inform conservation. We reviewed the results of 3 mail-in surveys that asked community members to say whether they thought koala populations were increasing, decreasing, or staying the same. We then compared the survey results with population trends derived from more traditional research. Population trends identified through community wisdom were similar to the trends identified by traditional research. The community wisdom surveys, however, allowed the question to be addressed at much broader geographical scales and time frames. Studies that apply community wisdom have the benefit of engaging a broad section of the community in conservation research and education and therefore in the political process of conserving species.
dc.publisherWiley
dc.rights© 2016 Society for Conservation Biology
dc.sourceConservation biology : the journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
dc.subjectciencia ciudadana
dc.subjectciencia comunitaria
dc.subjectcitizen science
dc.subjectcommunity science
dc.subjectcommunity surveys
dc.subjectencuestas comunitarias
dc.subjectkoala
dc.subjectsabiduría de la multitud
dc.subjectwisdom of the crowd
dc.titleThe contribution of community wisdom to conservation ecology
dc.typeJournal article
local.identifier.citationvolume30
dc.date.issued2016-06
local.publisher.urlhttp://au.wiley.com/WileyCDA/
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationStalenberg, E., Research School of Biology, The Australian National University
local.identifier.essn1523-1739
local.bibliographicCitation.issue3
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage496
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage505
local.identifier.doi10.1111/cobi.12698
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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