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A systematic review of the predictions of the Interpersonal-Psychological Theory of Suicidal Behavior

Ma, Jennifer; Batterham, Philip; Calear, Alison L; Han, Jin

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CONTEXT Since the development of the Interpersonal Psychological Theory (IPTS; Joiner, 2005), a growing body of literature has emerged testing different aspects of the theory across a range of populations. OBJECTIVE The aim of this review was to identify support for the IPTS, and critical gaps in the evidence base, by systematically reviewing current evidence testing the effects of thwarted belongingness, perceived burdensomeness, and acquired capability on suicide ideation and attempt. METHODS...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorMa, Jennifer
dc.contributor.authorBatterham, Philip
dc.contributor.authorCalear, Alison L
dc.contributor.authorHan, Jin
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-04T04:13:00Z
dc.date.available2016-10-04T04:13:00Z
dc.identifier.issn0272-7358
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/109129
dc.description.abstractCONTEXT Since the development of the Interpersonal Psychological Theory (IPTS; Joiner, 2005), a growing body of literature has emerged testing different aspects of the theory across a range of populations. OBJECTIVE The aim of this review was to identify support for the IPTS, and critical gaps in the evidence base, by systematically reviewing current evidence testing the effects of thwarted belongingness, perceived burdensomeness, and acquired capability on suicide ideation and attempt. METHODS PsycInfo and PubMed databases were electronically searched for articles published between January 2005 and July 2015. Articles were included if they directly assessed the IPTS constructs as predictors of suicidal ideation or suicide attempt. RESULTS Fifty-eight articles reporting on 66 studies were identified. Contrary to expectations, the studies provided mixed evidence across the theory's main predictions. The effect of perceived burdensomeness on suicide ideation was the most tested and supported relationship. The theory's other predictions, particularly in terms of critical interaction effects, were less strongly supported. CONCLUSIONS Future research focused on expanding the availability of valid measurement approaches for the interpersonal risk factors, and further elaborating upon their mixed relationships with suicide ideation and attempt across multiple populations is important to advance theoretical and clinical progress in the field.
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.rights© 2016 Elsevier Ltd. http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/issn/0272-7358/..."Authors pre-print on any website, including arXiv and RePEC" from SHERPA/RoMEO site (as at 7/10/16).
dc.sourceClinical psychology review
dc.subjectacquired capability
dc.subjectinterpersonal psychological theory
dc.subjectperceived burdensomeness
dc.subjectsuicide
dc.subjectsystematic review
dc.subjectthwarted belongingness
dc.titleA systematic review of the predictions of the Interpersonal-Psychological Theory of Suicidal Behavior
dc.typeJournal article
local.identifier.citationvolume46
dc.date.issued2016-06
local.publisher.urlhttp://www.elsevier.com/
local.type.statusSubmitted Version
local.contributor.affiliationMa, J., Center for Mental Health Research, Research School of Population Health, The Australian National University
local.contributor.affiliationBatterham, P. J., Center for Mental Health Research, Research School of Population Health, The Australian National University
local.contributor.affiliationCalear, A. L., Center for Mental Health Research, Research School of Population Health, The Australian National University
local.contributor.affiliationHan, J., Center for Mental Health Research, Research School of Population Health, The Australian National University
local.identifier.essn1873-7811
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage34
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage45
local.identifier.doi10.1016/j.cpr.2016.04.008
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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