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Being Sami: an ethnography of identity through the lens of the Riddu Riđđu festival

Hansen, Klara

Description

Since the 1960s Sami people have been actively seeking recognition of their Indigenous status. The notion of Sami people as Indigenous has developed along with the rise of indigeneity since the Second World War. The push for recognition received a major boost in the late 1970s – early 1980s during the conflict over the proposed Áltá dam. Building the dam would have led to the flooding of the Sami majority village of Máze and disrupted reindeer herding and...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorHansen, Klara
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-13T03:24:55Z
dc.identifier.otherb39905329
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/108736
dc.description.abstractSince the 1960s Sami people have been actively seeking recognition of their Indigenous status. The notion of Sami people as Indigenous has developed along with the rise of indigeneity since the Second World War. The push for recognition received a major boost in the late 1970s – early 1980s during the conflict over the proposed Áltá dam. Building the dam would have led to the flooding of the Sami majority village of Máze and disrupted reindeer herding and salmon fishing. The activity against the dam and the attention it gained marked the beginning of traction in political arenas that has since influenced Sami people’s access to rights and recognition as Indigenous. An increasingly articulated part of the process of recognition is the negotiation and transformation of Sami identity including that of Coastal Sami people. Control over Sami identification has gone from being primarily the domain of non-Sami colonisers to that of Sami people themselves. The conditions surrounding presentations, articulations and transformations of Sami identity are explored. This exploration includes an examination of the traits people need to have to present themselves as Sami and have their identities recognised by others, as well as how these traits are expressed in order to gain recognition and rights. Inspired by Brubaker and Cooper (2000), identity is adopted as a category of analysis. This means clearly presenting processes, practices and relationships in terms of their implications for identity. The ethnographic lens through which these issues are examined is principally the Riddu Riđđu festival, an international Indigenous peoples’ festival held in Norway run primarily by Sami people.
dc.language.isoen
dc.subjectSami
dc.subjectIndigenous
dc.subjectindigeneity
dc.subjectidentity
dc.subjectanthropology
dc.subjectNorway
dc.subjectethnography
dc.subjectSapmi
dc.subjectRiddu Riđđu
dc.subjectindigenous identity
dc.subjectSami identity
dc.subjectinternational indigenous
dc.subjectSaami
dc.subjectSámi
dc.subjectkinship
dc.subjectrelationships to land
dc.subjectlanguage
dc.titleBeing Sami: an ethnography of identity through the lens of the Riddu Riđđu festival
dc.typeThesis (PhD)
local.contributor.supervisorPeterson, Nicolas
local.contributor.supervisorcontactnicolas.peterson@anu.edu.au
dcterms.valid2016
local.type.degreeDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)
dc.date.issued2015
local.contributor.affiliationSchool of Archaeology and Anthropology, College of Arts and Social Sciences, The Australian National University
local.identifier.doi10.25911/5d7789ea1121d
dc.provenanceThe author granted permission to make it open access via email on 16 Dec 2019
local.mintdoimint
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