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Cognitive, health, and sociodemographic predictors of longitudinal decline in hearing acuity among older adults

Kiely, Kim M.; Gopinath, Bamini; Mitchell, Paul; Luszcz, Mary A.; Anstey, Kaarin

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BACKGROUND: We aimed to investigate predictors of change in pure-tone hearing thresholds in older adults. METHODS: Data were drawn from a pooled sample from the Dynamic Analyses to Optimise Ageing (DYNOPTA) project (N = 4,221, mean age = 73.6, range: 50-103 years). Pure-tone hearing thresholds were tested for frequencies between 0.5 and 8 kHz, on up to four occasions over a period of 11 years. Linear mixed models tested for predictors of change in hearing. RESULTS. Hearing loss for high-range...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorKiely, Kim M.
dc.contributor.authorGopinath, Bamini
dc.contributor.authorMitchell, Paul
dc.contributor.authorLuszcz, Mary A.
dc.contributor.authorAnstey, Kaarin
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-23T00:47:22Z
dc.date.available2013-10-23T00:47:22Z
dc.identifier.issn1079-5006
dc.identifier.issn1758-535X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/10628
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: We aimed to investigate predictors of change in pure-tone hearing thresholds in older adults. METHODS: Data were drawn from a pooled sample from the Dynamic Analyses to Optimise Ageing (DYNOPTA) project (N = 4,221, mean age = 73.6, range: 50-103 years). Pure-tone hearing thresholds were tested for frequencies between 0.5 and 8 kHz, on up to four occasions over a period of 11 years. Linear mixed models tested for predictors of change in hearing. RESULTS. Hearing loss for high-range frequencies preceded decline in low-range frequencies. Men had higher baseline hearing thresholds, but women experienced faster rates of decline in hearing for mid- to high-range frequencies. The estimated rate of change for a 75-year-old adult was 0.91 decibel hearing level (dB HL) per year for pure-tone thresholds averaged over frequencies ranging between 0.5 and 4 kHz in the better ear. Baseline age (b = 0.03, p < .01), hypertension (b = 0.15, p < .01), and probable cognitive impairment (b = 0.40, p = .01) were independent predictors of annual rate of change in hearing thresholds. Incidence of probable cognitive impairment was also associated with higher hearing thresholds. Other known correlates for prevalence of hearing impairment, including low education, noise damage, diabetes, and history of stroke were independently associated with baseline levels of hearing but were not predictive of change in hearing thresholds. CONCLUSIONS: Faster rates of decline in hearing are predicted by probable cognitive impairment and hypertension.
dc.description.sponsorshipNHMRC (National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia)
dc.format26 pages
dc.publisherOxford University Press
dc.publisherGerontological Society of America
dc.rightshttp://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/issn/1079-5006/ Author can archive pre-print. Post-print may be archived after 12 months embargo period. Publisher's version/PDF may not be archived. Pre-print can only be posted prior to acceptance. Pre-print must be accompanied by set statement (see link). Pre-print must not be replaced with post-print, instead a link to published version with amended set statement should be made. Post-print in Institutional repositories or Central repositories. Published source must be acknowledged. Must link to publisher version. Set phrase to accompany archived copy (see policy) - from SHERPA/RoMEO site (as at 10/10/13)
dc.sourceJournals of Gerontology, Series A, Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences 67.9 (2012): 997-1003
dc.subjectpresbycusis
dc.subjectage-related hearing loss
dc.subjectcognitive impairment
dc.subjectAustralian Longitudinal Study of Ageing
dc.subjectBlue Mountains Eye Study
dc.titleCognitive, health, and sociodemographic predictors of longitudinal decline in hearing acuity among older adults
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesThis research has been funded with a grant - NHMRC. RGMS (Research Grants Management System) publication no. P001587687
local.identifier.citationvolume67A
dcterms.dateAccepted2012-01-24
dc.date.issued2012-03-13
local.identifier.absfor170100 - PSYCHOLOGY
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4056230xPUB149
local.publisher.urlhttp://www.oup.com.au/
local.type.statusSubmitted Version
local.contributor.affiliationKiely, Kim M., ANU, Centre for Mental Health Research, Ageing Research Unit
local.contributor.affiliationGopinath, Bamini, University of Sydney, Centre for Vision Research, Westmead Millennium Institute
local.contributor.affiliationMitchell, Paul, University of Sydney, Centre for Vision Research, Westmead Millennium Institute
local.contributor.affiliationLuszcz, Mary M., Flinders University, Flinders Centre for Ageing Studies and Department of Psychology
local.contributor.affiliationAnstey, Kaarin J., ANU, Centre for Mental Health Research, Ageing Research Unit
local.bibliographicCitation.issue6
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage7
local.identifier.doi10.1093/gerona/gls066
local.identifier.absseo920107 - Hearing, Vision, Speech and Their Disorders
dc.date.updated2015-12-08T10:45:17Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84865780270
local.identifier.thomsonID000308240900011
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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