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Bending with the Wind: An Integrative Process Model of Career Adaptation

Tolentino, Laramie

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Guided by the Career Construction Theory (CCT; Savickas, 2013), this program of research examined an integrative process model of career adaptation and provided construct validity evidence for the career adaptability measure (i.e., Career Adapt-Abilities Scale). Three empirical studies were carried out to clarify the relationships between adaptivity, adaptability, and adaptation outcomes across career stages and contexts. These studies offer empirical...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorTolentino, Laramie
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-16T00:16:01Z
dc.identifier.otherb39905330
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/104119
dc.description.abstractGuided by the Career Construction Theory (CCT; Savickas, 2013), this program of research examined an integrative process model of career adaptation and provided construct validity evidence for the career adaptability measure (i.e., Career Adapt-Abilities Scale). Three empirical studies were carried out to clarify the relationships between adaptivity, adaptability, and adaptation outcomes across career stages and contexts. These studies offer empirical groundwork to test the theoretical assertions of CCT. Furthermore, it elaborates the existing nomological network of career adaptability by investigating its dispositional antecedents, socio-cognitive mechanism, and career success outcomes. Altogether, the current research aims to explicate how individuals enact their careers while successfully adjusting to changing work demands and conditions. The primary objective of empirical paper 1 was to examine the dispositional antecedents of career adaptability and provide factorial and convergent validity evidence for the Career Adapt-Abilities Scale (CAAS) among Australian university students (N = 555). Path analysis was performed to test the relationship between proactive personality, learning goal orientation, career optimism, and career adaptability. The hypothesized relationships were supported. Results also confirmed the factorial and convergent validity of CAAS and it demonstrated internal consistency over a 4-week interval between measurements. To further provide validity evidence and extend the CCT model in the entrepreneurial career context, empirical paper 2 examined the outcomes of career adaptability using a sample of Serbian business students (N = 380). Results supported the moderated mediation model and as predicted: (a) career adaptability was positively associated with entrepreneurial intentions and (b) the mediated relationship between career adaptability and entrepreneurial intentions via entrepreneurial self-efficacy was stronger for individuals with prior exposure to family business. Once again, the results demonstrated evidence for internal consistency and construct validity of CAAS. Finally, empirical paper 3 examined the overall model of successful career adaptation by investigating the relationship between adaptivity (e.g., tenacious goal pursuit and flexible goal adjustment) and career success outcomes (e.g., career satisfaction and promotability) via career adaptability. It also tested the validity and psychometric utility of CAAS in a non-Western and developing economy context. Results demonstrated evidence for internal consistency and convergent validity of CAAS in a sample of Filipino university students (N = 289) and working adults (N = 495). Furthermore, the proposed mediated model was supported and as predicted: (a) tenacious goal pursuit and flexible goal adjustment was positively associated with career adaptability, (b) career adaptability was positively associated with career success outcomes, and (c) tenacious goal pursuit and flexible goal adjustment was indirectly related to career success outcomes via career adaptability. Taken together, the present research was able to bring robust contributions to further our understanding of career adaptability. First, it substantiated the psychometric utility and construct validity of the CAAS across career stages and contexts over a period a time. As a whole, the empirical studies shed light on how individuals, in both organizational and entrepreneurial career pathways, use their self-regulation resources to successfully navigate through transitions in an increasingly complex career landscape. Theoretical and practical implications, and research directions are provided.
dc.language.isoen
dc.subjectcareer adaptability
dc.subjectdual coping tendencies
dc.subjectcareer success
dc.subjectpromotability
dc.subjectcareer satisfaction
dc.subjectlearning goal orientation
dc.subjectoptimism
dc.subjectentrepreneurial self-efficacy
dc.subjectcareer construction theory
dc.subjectcareer adapt-abilities scale
dc.subjectcareer development
dc.subjecttenacious goal pursuits
dc.subjectflexible goal adjustment
dc.subjectproactive personality
dc.subjectentrepreneurial intention
dc.subjectfamily business
dc.titleBending with the Wind: An Integrative Process Model of Career Adaptation
dc.typeThesis (PhD)
local.contributor.supervisorRestubog, Simon Lloyd
local.contributor.supervisorBordia, Prashant
local.contributor.supervisorcontactsimon.restubog@anu.edu.au
local.contributor.supervisorcontactprashant.bordia@anu.edu.au
dcterms.valid2016
local.type.degreeDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)
dc.date.issued2015
local.contributor.affiliationResearch School of Management, College of Business and Economics, The Australian National University
local.identifier.doi10.25911/5d78d51163c81
local.mintdoimint
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