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Work-family enrichment and satisfaction: The mediating role of self-efficacy and work-life balance

Chan, Xi Wen; Kalliath, Thomas; Brough, Paula; Siu, Oi-Ling; O'Driscoll, Michael Patrick; Timms, Carolyn

Description

Although the direct effects of work–family enrichment on satisfaction are well-documented, previous theoretical predictions and empirical findings of the relationship have been inconsistent. Drawing on social cognitive theory, the current research examined how work–family enrichment contributes to job and family satisfaction by exploring the mediating mechanisms of self-efficacy and work–life balance. This study also empirically validated a new self-efficacy measure using the work–life...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorChan, Xi Wen
dc.contributor.authorKalliath, Thomas
dc.contributor.authorBrough, Paula
dc.contributor.authorSiu, Oi-Ling
dc.contributor.authorO'Driscoll, Michael Patrick
dc.contributor.authorTimms, Carolyn
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-14T23:21:21Z
dc.identifier.issn0958-5192
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/103860
dc.description.abstractAlthough the direct effects of work–family enrichment on satisfaction are well-documented, previous theoretical predictions and empirical findings of the relationship have been inconsistent. Drawing on social cognitive theory, the current research examined how work–family enrichment contributes to job and family satisfaction by exploring the mediating mechanisms of self-efficacy and work–life balance. This study also empirically validated a new self-efficacy measure using the work–life interface nomological network. A heterogeneous sample of Australian employees (N = 234) from four different organisations responded to two waves of data collection separated by a 12-month interval. Using structural equation modelling, the results of the statistical analysis provided preliminary support for the hypothesised chain mediation model and the newly developed five-item self-efficacy to regulate work and life scale. Specifically, work-to-family enrichment and family-to-work enrichment were positively related to self-efficacy, which in turn had a positive effect on work–life balance. Similarly, work–life balance had a positive impact on job and family satisfaction. Evidence of these relationships over time was demonstrated, thereby emphasising the importance of person–cognitive resources (e.g. self-efficacy) in influencing life outcomes. Validation of the self-efficacy scale also demonstrated robust psychometric properties and criterion validity. Implications of these results were subsequently discussed.
dc.publisherRoutledge, Taylor & Francis Group
dc.rightshttp://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/issn/0958-5192/..." author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). On institutional repository or subject-based repository after a 18 months embargo" from SHERPA/RoMEO site (as at 18/04/17). This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in The International Journal of Human Resource Management on 15/10/2015, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/09585192.2015.1075574
dc.sourceThe International Journal of Human Resource Management
dc.titleWork-family enrichment and satisfaction: The mediating role of self-efficacy and work-life balance
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolumePublished online: 09 Oct 2015
dc.date.issued2015
local.identifier.absfor150311 - Organisational Behaviour
local.identifier.absfor160701 - Clinical Social Work Practice
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4794020xPUB1
local.type.statusAccepted Version
local.contributor.affiliationChan, Xi Wen, College of Business and Economics, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationKalliath, Thomas, College of Business and Economics, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationBrough, Paula, Griffith University
local.contributor.affiliationSiu, Oi-Ling, Lingnan University
local.contributor.affiliationO'Driscoll, Michael Patrick, University of Waikato
local.contributor.affiliationTimms, Carolyn, James Cook University
local.identifier.doi10.1080/09585192.2015.1075574
local.identifier.absseo920505 - Occupational Health
dc.date.updated2016-06-14T09:08:22Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84945217575
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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