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Crime, greenspace and life satisfaction: An evaluation of the New Zealand experience

Fleming, Christopher Mark; Manning, Matthew; Ambrey, Christopher L

Description

In this study we explore the relationship between the benefits of greenspace and fear of crime in New Zealand neighbourhoods. To ensure that the full benefits of investment in greenspace are realised, it is important to understand the complex interactions that occur within natural environments and the effect of these interactions on individual wellbeing within different populations (in this case New Zealand). Employing an ordered logit model, this study uses data on self-reported life...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorFleming, Christopher Mark
dc.contributor.authorManning, Matthew
dc.contributor.authorAmbrey, Christopher L
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-14T23:20:57Z
dc.identifier.issn0169-2046
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/103631
dc.description.abstractIn this study we explore the relationship between the benefits of greenspace and fear of crime in New Zealand neighbourhoods. To ensure that the full benefits of investment in greenspace are realised, it is important to understand the complex interactions that occur within natural environments and the effect of these interactions on individual wellbeing within different populations (in this case New Zealand). Employing an ordered logit model, this study uses data on self-reported life satisfaction, fear of crime and access to greenspace from the New Zealand General Social Survey. In line with existing evidence, results suggest that greater access to greenspace is associated with higher levels of life satisfaction. The strength of this association, however, is strongly dependent on fear of crime. That is, when residents report that they feel ‘unsafe’ or ‘very unsafe’ in their neighbourhood, the psychological benefits of access to greenspace disappear almost entirely. This relationship is conditioned further by age and gender, with residents between 50 and 59 years of age and males being less likely to report being very satisfied with their lives. Given the considerable level of public investment in providing and maintaining greenspace, there is a clear need to address fear of crime in the neighbourhood in order to ensure that the full benefits of policies directed at promoting the use of neighbourhood greenspace for health and well-being can be realised.
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.sourceLandscape and Urban Planning
dc.titleCrime, greenspace and life satisfaction: An evaluation of the New Zealand experience
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume149
dc.date.issued2016
local.identifier.absfor140299 - Applied Economics not elsewhere classified
local.identifier.absfor160201 - Causes and Prevention of Crime
local.identifier.absfor160510 - Public Policy
local.identifier.ariespublicationU3488905xPUB8994
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationFleming, Christopher Mark, Griffith University
local.contributor.affiliationManning, Matthew, College of Arts and Social Sciences, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationAmbrey, Christopher L, Griffith University
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage10
local.identifier.doi10.1016/j.landurbplan.2015.12.014
dc.date.updated2016-06-14T08:54:26Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84955581381
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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