Skip navigation
Skip navigation

Alcohol consumption patterns in Thailand and their relationship with non-communicable disease

Wakabayashi, Mami; McKetin, Rebecca; Banwell, Cathy; Yiengprugsawan, Vasoontara; Kelly, Matthew; Seubsman, Sam-ang; Iso, Hiroyasu; Sleigh, Adrian

Description

Background: Heavy alcohol consumption is an established risk factor for non-communicable diseases (NCDs) but few studies have investigated drinking and disease risk in middle income, non-western countries. We report on the relationship between alcohol consumption and NCDs in Thailand. Methods: A nationwide cross sectional survey was conducted of 87,151 Thai adult open university students aged 15 to 87 years (mean age 30.5 years) who were recruited into the Thai Cohort Study. Participants were...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorWakabayashi, Mami
dc.contributor.authorMcKetin, Rebecca
dc.contributor.authorBanwell, Cathy
dc.contributor.authorYiengprugsawan, Vasoontara
dc.contributor.authorKelly, Matthew
dc.contributor.authorSeubsman, Sam-ang
dc.contributor.authorIso, Hiroyasu
dc.contributor.authorSleigh, Adrian
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-14T23:20:52Z
dc.identifier.issn1471-2458
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/103588
dc.description.abstractBackground: Heavy alcohol consumption is an established risk factor for non-communicable diseases (NCDs) but few studies have investigated drinking and disease risk in middle income, non-western countries. We report on the relationship between alcohol consumption and NCDs in Thailand. Methods: A nationwide cross sectional survey was conducted of 87,151 Thai adult open university students aged 15 to 87 years (mean age 30.5 years) who were recruited into the Thai Cohort Study. Participants were categorized as never having drunk alcohol (n = 22,527), as being occasional drinkers who drank infrequently but heavily (4+ glasses/occasion - occasional heavy drinkers, n = 24,152) or drank infrequently and less heavily (<4 glasses/occasion - occasional light drinkers, n = 26,861). Current regular drinkers were subdivided into those who either drank heavily (4 + glasses per occasion - regular heavy drinkers, n = 3,675) or those who drank less (<4 glasses/occasion -regular light drinkers, n = 490). There were 7,548 ex-drinkers in the study. Outcomes were lifetime diagnoses of selfreported NCDs and obesity (body mass index ≥ 25). Results: Most women were never drinkers (40 % among females) or occasional light drinkers (39 %), in contrast to men (11 % and 22 %, respectively). Alcohol consumption was associated with urban in-migration and other recognized risks for NCDs (sedentary lifestyle and poor diet). After adjustment for these factors the odds ratios (ORs) for several NCDs outcomes - high cholesterol, hypertension, and liver disease - were significantly elevated among both occasional heavy drinkers (1.2 to 1.5) and regular heavy drinkers (1.5 to 2.0) relative to never drinkers. Conclusions: Heavy alcohol consumption of 4 or more glasses per occasion, even if the occasions were infrequent, was associated with elevated risk of NCDs in Thailand. These results highlight the need for strategies in Thailand to reduce the quantity of alcohol consumed to prevent alcohol-related disease. Thailand is fortunate that most of the female population is culturally protected from drinking and this national public good should be endorsed and supported.
dc.publisherBioMed Central Ltd.
dc.rightsAuthor/s retain copyright
dc.sourceBMC Public Health
dc.titleAlcohol consumption patterns in Thailand and their relationship with non-communicable disease
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume15
dc.date.issued2015
local.identifier.absfor111706 - Epidemiology
local.identifier.absfor111714 - Mental Health
local.identifier.ariespublicationU3488905xPUB8489
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationWakabayashi, Mami, Osaka University
local.contributor.affiliationMcKetin, Rebecca, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationBanwell, Cathy, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationYiengprugsawan, Vasoontara, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationKelly, Matthew, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationSeubsman, Sam-ang, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationIso, Hiroyasu, Osaka University
local.contributor.affiliationSleigh, Adrian, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.bibliographicCitation.issue1297
local.identifier.doi10.1186/s12889-015-2662-9
local.identifier.absseo920199 - Clinical Health (Organs, Diseases and Abnormal Conditions) not elsewhere classified
dc.date.updated2016-06-14T08:53:48Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84951283149
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
CollectionsANU Research Publications

Download

File Description SizeFormat Image
01_Wakabayashi_Alcohol_consumption_patterns_2015.pdf433.75 kBAdobe PDF


Items in Open Research are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Updated:  19 May 2020/ Responsible Officer:  University Librarian/ Page Contact:  Library Systems & Web Coordinator