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Genetic population structure and fungicide resistance of Botrytis cinerea in pear orchards in the Western Cape of South Africa

Wessels, Bernard A.; Linde, Celeste; Fourie, P.H.; Mostert, Lizel

Description

Botrytis cinerea isolates from pear blossoms (Pyrus communis) in South Africa were collected from four orchards in two production areas in the Western Cape. The cryptic species status based on vegetative-incompatibility alleles of the Bc-hch gene indicated that all the isolates belonged to B. cinerea. A microsatellite analysis of B. cinerea populations was performed to assess the genetic population structure. Total gene diversity (H) was high, with a mean of 0.69 across all populations. Some...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorWessels, Bernard A.
dc.contributor.authorLinde, Celeste
dc.contributor.authorFourie, P.H.
dc.contributor.authorMostert, Lizel
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-14T23:19:32Z
dc.identifier.issn0032-0862
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/102938
dc.description.abstractBotrytis cinerea isolates from pear blossoms (Pyrus communis) in South Africa were collected from four orchards in two production areas in the Western Cape. The cryptic species status based on vegetative-incompatibility alleles of the Bc-hch gene indicated that all the isolates belonged to B. cinerea. A microsatellite analysis of B. cinerea populations was performed to assess the genetic population structure. Total gene diversity (H) was high, with a mean of 0.69 across all populations. Some genotype flow was evident between orchards as indicated by the spread of microsatellite multilocus genotypes, in agreement with the moderate, but significant population differentiation among orchards (mean φPT = 0.118, P = 0.001). Index of association analyses (IA and r̅d) suggest that the populations reproduce mostly asexually, even though mating type distribution did not differ significantly from a 1:1 ratio, suggesting frequency-dependent selection. Isolates resistant to benomyl were evident in one orchard only. This orchard was also significantly differentiated from all other populations, suggesting infrequent localized selection for benomyl resistance. Overall, the findings of this study highlight the dangers of a mixed reproduction system, and stress the importance of regularly monitoring fungicide resistance levels towards developing more efficient management practices.
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd
dc.sourcePlant Pathology
dc.titleGenetic population structure and fungicide resistance of Botrytis cinerea in pear orchards in the Western Cape of South Africa
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolumePublished online: 16 March 2016
dc.date.issued2016
local.identifier.absfor060300 - EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY
local.identifier.absfor060500 - MICROBIOLOGY
local.identifier.absfor070300 - CROP AND PASTURE PRODUCTION
local.identifier.ariespublicationU3488905xPUB11782
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationWessels, Bernard A., Stellenbosch University
local.contributor.affiliationLinde, Celeste, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationFourie, P.H., Citrus Research International
local.contributor.affiliationMostert, Lizel, Stellenbosch University
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.identifier.doi10.1111/ppa.12523
local.identifier.absseo970106 - Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
dc.date.updated2016-06-14T08:40:40Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84960983841
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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