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Early life predictors of increased body mass index among indigenous Australian children

Thurber, Katherine; Dobbins, Timothy; Kirk, Martyn; Dance, Phyllis; Banwell, Cathy

Description

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians are more likely than non-Indigenous Australians to be obese and experience chronic disease in adulthood - conditions linked to being overweight in childhood. Birthweight and prenatal exposures are associated with increased Body Mass Index (BMI) in other populations, but the relationship is unclear for Indigenous children. The Longitudinal Study of Indigenous Children is an ongoing cohort study of up to 1,759 children across Australia. We used a...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorThurber, Katherine
dc.contributor.authorDobbins, Timothy
dc.contributor.authorKirk, Martyn
dc.contributor.authorDance, Phyllis
dc.contributor.authorBanwell, Cathy
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-14T23:19:03Z
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/102727
dc.description.abstractAboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians are more likely than non-Indigenous Australians to be obese and experience chronic disease in adulthood - conditions linked to being overweight in childhood. Birthweight and prenatal exposures are associated with increased Body Mass Index (BMI) in other populations, but the relationship is unclear for Indigenous children. The Longitudinal Study of Indigenous Children is an ongoing cohort study of up to 1,759 children across Australia. We used a multilevel model to examine the association between children's birthweight and BMI z-score in 2011, at age 3-9 years, adjusted for sociodemographic and maternal factors. Complete data were available for 682 of the 1,264 children participating in the 2011 survey; we repeated the analyses in the full sample with BMI recorded (n=1,152) after multilevel multiple imputation. One in ten children were born large for gestational age, and 17% were born small for gestational age. Increasing birthweight predicted increasing BMI; a 1-unit increase in birthweight z-score was associated with a 0.22-unit (95% CI:0.13, 0.31) increase in childhood BMI z-score. Maternal smoking during pregnancy was associated with a significant increase (0.25; 95% CI:0.05, 0.45) in BMI z-score. The multiple imputation analysis indicated that our findings were not distorted by biases in the missing data. High birthweight may be a risk indicator for overweight and obesity among Indigenous children. National targets to reduce the incidence of low birthweight which measure progress by an increase in the population's average birthweight may be ignoring a significant health risk; both ends of the spectrum must be considered. Interventions to improve maternal health during pregnancy are the first step to decreasing the prevalence of high BMI among the next generation of Indigenous children.
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science
dc.rightsAuthor/s retain copyright
dc.sourcePLOS ONE (Public Library of Science)
dc.subjectKeywords: Article; birth weight; body mass; child; cohort analysis; controlled study; demography; disease association; female; gestational age; health hazard; human; incidence; Indigenous Australian; male; maternal smoking; maternal welfare; outcome assessment; pre
dc.titleEarly life predictors of increased body mass index among indigenous Australian children
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume10
dc.date.issued2015
local.identifier.absfor111700 - PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH SERVICES
local.identifier.absfor111701 - Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health
local.identifier.absfor111706 - Epidemiology
local.identifier.ariespublicationa383154xPUB2806
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationThurber, Katherine, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationDobbins, Timothy, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationKirk, Martyn, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationDance, Phyllis, Other Non-College Academic, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationBanwell, Cathy, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.bibliographicCitation.issue6
local.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0130039
dc.date.updated2019-06-02T08:16:13Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84936851728
local.identifier.thomsonID000356329900126
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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