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Weak-light phase tracking with a low cycle slip rate

Francis, Samuel P.; Lam, Timothy T-Y.; McKenzie, Kirk; Sutton, Andrew J.; Ward, Robert L.; McClelland, David E.; Shaddock, Daniel A.

Description

The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment Follow-On mission will use a phase-locked loop to track changes in the phase of an optical signal that has been transmitted hundreds of kilometers between two spacecraft. Beam diffraction significantly reduces the received signal power, making it difficult to track, as the phase-locked loop is more susceptible to cycle slips. The lowest reported weak-light phase locking is at 40 fW with a cycle slip rate of 1 cycle per second. By selecting a...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorFrancis, Samuel P.
dc.contributor.authorLam, Timothy T-Y.
dc.contributor.authorMcKenzie, Kirk
dc.contributor.authorSutton, Andrew J.
dc.contributor.authorWard, Robert L.
dc.contributor.authorMcClelland, David E.
dc.contributor.authorShaddock, Daniel A.
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-06T02:25:17Z
dc.date.available2016-06-06T02:25:17Z
dc.identifier.issn0146-9592
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/102008
dc.description.abstractThe Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment Follow-On mission will use a phase-locked loop to track changes in the phase of an optical signal that has been transmitted hundreds of kilometers between two spacecraft. Beam diffraction significantly reduces the received signal power, making it difficult to track, as the phase-locked loop is more susceptible to cycle slips. The lowest reported weak-light phase locking is at 40 fW with a cycle slip rate of 1 cycle per second. By selecting a phase-locked loop bandwidth that minimized the signal variance due to shot noise and laser phase fluctuations, a 30 fW signal has been tracked with a cycle slip rate less than 0.01 cycles per second. This is tracking at a power 25% lower with a 100-fold improvement in the cycle slip rate. This capability will enable a new class of missions, opening up new opportunities for space-based interferometry.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was completed with the support of the Australian Research Council. Part of this research was performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).
dc.publisherOptical Society of America
dc.rights© 2014 Optical Society of America
dc.sourceOptics Letters
dc.titleWeak-light phase tracking with a low cycle slip rate
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume39
dc.date.issued2014
local.identifier.absfor020500
local.identifier.ariespublicationU3488905xPUB4620
local.publisher.urlhttp://www.osa.org/en-us/home/
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationFrancis, Samuel, College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, CPMS Research School of Physics and Engineering, Department of Quantum Science, The Australian National University
local.contributor.affiliationLam, Timothy, College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, CPMS Research School of Physics and Engineering, Department of Quantum Science, The Australian National University
local.contributor.affiliationMcKenzie, Kirk, California Institute of Technology, United States of America
local.contributor.affiliationSutton, Andrew, College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, CPMS Research School of Physics and Engineering, Department of Quantum Science, The Australian National University
local.contributor.affiliationWard, Robert, College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, CPMS Research School of Physics and Engineering, Department of Quantum Science, The Australian National University
local.contributor.affiliationMcClelland, David, College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, CPMS Research School of Physics and Engineering, Department of Quantum Science, The Australian National University
local.contributor.affiliationShaddock, Daniel, College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, CPMS Research School of Physics and Engineering, Department of Quantum Science, The Australian National University
local.bibliographicCitation.issue18
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage5251
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage5254
local.identifier.doi10.1364/OL.39.005251
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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