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Singing Bowls App Demo

Martin, Charles

Description

This video shows a demo of Singing Bowls, a touch-screen musical instrument app for iPad. Singing Bowls consists of an annular interface where each ring represents a different pitch. Tapping the rings produces a short sound, while swirling or swiping produces continuous sounds. As a prototype app, Singing Bowls was used in research and performance activities in 2014 with Ensemble Metatone. A refined version of Singing Bowls, PhaseRings, was later publicly released on the iTunes App Store.

dc.contributor.authorMartin, Charles
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-02T01:41:24Z
dc.date.available2016-06-02T01:41:24Z
dc.date.created2016
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/101938
dc.description.abstractThis video shows a demo of Singing Bowls, a touch-screen musical instrument app for iPad. Singing Bowls consists of an annular interface where each ring represents a different pitch. Tapping the rings produces a short sound, while swirling or swiping produces continuous sounds. As a prototype app, Singing Bowls was used in research and performance activities in 2014 with Ensemble Metatone. A refined version of Singing Bowls, PhaseRings, was later publicly released on the iTunes App Store.
dc.format.mimetypevideo/quicktime
dc.rightsCopyright 2016 Charles Martin
dc.subjectcomputer music
dc.subjecttouch-screen performance
dc.subjectiPad app
dc.titleSinging Bowls App Demo
dc.typeVideo recording
dc.typeInvention
dc.typeCreative work
local.type.statusSubmitted Version
local.contributor.affiliationResearch School of Computer Science, The Australian National University
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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5-SingingBowls-Demo.movVideo176.25 MBVideo Quicktime


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