Skip navigation
Skip navigation

Interlanguage phonology : acquisition of timing control and perceptual categorization of durational contrast in Japanese

Toda, Takako

Description

The timing organization of phonological durational contrast is known to be one of the most challenging areas in the acquisition of Japanese phonology (Sugito 1989; Muraki and Nakaoka 1990; Han 1992; Toda 1994). This study examines the acquisition of timing control and perceptual categorization of the durational contrast in Japanese, and aims to contribute to second language acquisition theory from the viewpoint of interlanguage phonology. Acoustic techniques were used to investigate the...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorToda, Takako
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-16T00:40:03Z
dc.identifier.otherb1969572x
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/10040
dc.description.abstractThe timing organization of phonological durational contrast is known to be one of the most challenging areas in the acquisition of Japanese phonology (Sugito 1989; Muraki and Nakaoka 1990; Han 1992; Toda 1994). This study examines the acquisition of timing control and perceptual categorization of the durational contrast in Japanese, and aims to contribute to second language acquisition theory from the viewpoint of interlanguage phonology. Acoustic techniques were used to investigate the mechanisms of learners' speech perception and production. In order to capture the acquisition processes and the developmental factors in the formation of interlanguage phonology, both crosssectional and longitudinal experiments are conducted with different groups of learners at various proficiency levels, and the results were compared with those of native . speakers. The processes such as first language transfer, overexaggeration and phonetic approximation are observed in the learners' speech production. The acoustic observation revealed what has been claimed as genetically innate Universal Grammar (Chomsky and Halle 1968) pertaining to voice onset time, which is clearly observed in Japanese native speakers speech, is not operative in beginning learners' speech production. On the other hand, it is operative in advanced learners' speech which shares similarities with that of native speakers. The experimental results reported in this dissertation reveal crucial theoretical insufficiency concerning the "universal principle". This supposedly universal theory concerning voice onset time, should not be restricted to a specific language, runs into difficulties in explaining the reasons why this property does not show up with learners' speech production during the initial stages, but does show up later at more advanced stages (i.e. it is developmental, but not universal).
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.titleInterlanguage phonology : acquisition of timing control and perceptual categorization of durational contrast in Japanese
dc.typeThesis (PhD)
local.contributor.supervisorBackhouse, A.E.
dcterms.valid1996
local.description.notesSupervisor: Dr A.E. Backhouse
local.description.refereedYes
local.type.degreeDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)
dc.date.issued1996
local.contributor.affiliationAustralian National University, Japan Centre
local.request.emaillibrary.digital-thesis@anu.edu.au
local.request.nameDigital Theses
local.identifier.doi10.25911/5d78d8516de3a
local.mintdoimint
CollectionsOpen Access Theses

Download

File Description SizeFormat Image
Toda Thesis 1996.pdf52.72 MBAdobe PDFThumbnail


Items in Open Research are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Updated:  19 May 2020/ Responsible Officer:  University Librarian/ Page Contact:  Library Systems & Web Coordinator