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Private sector lessons for public sector reform in Indonesia [Journal article]

McLeod, Ross

Description

Although the Indonesian economy grew very rapidly — averaging over 7 per cent per annum — during the three decades of the Soeharto era, it suffered a severe setback with the onset of the Asian crisis in 1997-98, and has been unable to achieve similar growth rates on a sustained basis subsequently. The year-on-year growth rate for the March quarter, 2006 was only 4.6 per cent, and this rate has fallen consistently since the end of 2004 (Manning and Roesad, 2006:146). Although most output...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorMcLeod, Ross
dc.date.accessioned2009-09-17T04:42:22Z
dc.date.accessioned2010-12-20T06:05:31Z
dc.date.available2009-09-17T04:42:22Z
dc.date.available2010-12-20T06:05:31Z
dc.identifier.citationAgenda 13.3 (2006): 275-288
dc.identifier.issn1322-1833
dc.identifier.issn1447-4735
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10440/877
dc.identifier.urihttp://digitalcollections.anu.edu.au/handle/10440/877
dc.description.abstractAlthough the Indonesian economy grew very rapidly — averaging over 7 per cent per annum — during the three decades of the Soeharto era, it suffered a severe setback with the onset of the Asian crisis in 1997-98, and has been unable to achieve similar growth rates on a sustained basis subsequently. The year-on-year growth rate for the March quarter, 2006 was only 4.6 per cent, and this rate has fallen consistently since the end of 2004 (Manning and Roesad, 2006:146). Although most output is generated by the private sector, growth also depends heavily on the provision of complementary inputs by the public sector, most obviously physical infrastructure and an effective legal system. The fact that successive Indonesian governments have performed poorly on both these fronts provides a partial explanation for the relatively low economic growth rates of recent years.
dc.format14 pages
dc.publisherAustralian National University
dc.rightshttp://epress.anu.edu.au/faqs/faqs_copyright.html#1 "Authors are not permitted to publish works published by ANU E Press on any other web site except their personal sites or sites associated with their institutions, as long as these are non-commercial sites. Authors are permitted to post the title and abstract of their book on any relevant web site as well as posting links on any site that direct readers to ANU E Press site." - from publisher web site (as at 19/02/10)
dc.sourceAgenda: A Journal of Policy Analysis and Reform
dc.source.urihttp://epress.anu.edu.au/agenda/013/03/13-3-na-1.pdf
dc.titlePrivate sector lessons for public sector reform in Indonesia [Journal article]
dc.typeJournal article
local.identifier.citationvolume13
dc.date.issued2009-09-17T04:42:22Z
local.identifier.absfor140215 (50%), 150305 (50%)
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4002919xPUB38
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationMcLeod, Ross, Research School of Pacific and Asian Studies, Arndt-Corden Division of Economics
local.bibliographicCitation.issue3
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage275
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage288
dc.date.updated2015-12-08T03:31:27Z
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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