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More than one Adam? Revelation and philology in nineteenth-century China

Penny, Benjamin D C

Description

From Marco Polo to Richard Nixon, narratives of the encounter between Chinese and Westerners have been defining texts of European cultures and their descendants. Successive but sporadic reports from travellers, missionaries, diplomats, traders and others have provided a model of an alternative way of arranging people, of organizing their lives, of thinking about the state of being human; one that described a government that was, or at least was represented as being, as...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorPenny, Benjamin D C
dc.date.accessioned2009-08-31T04:56:19Z
dc.date.accessioned2010-12-20T06:04:14Z
dc.date.available2009-08-31T04:56:19Z
dc.date.available2010-12-20T06:04:14Z
dc.identifier.citationHumanities Research XIV.1 (2007): 31-50
dc.identifier.issn1440-0669
dc.identifier.issn1834-8491
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10440/794
dc.identifier.urihttp://digitalcollections.anu.edu.au/handle/10440/794
dc.description.abstractFrom Marco Polo to Richard Nixon, narratives of the encounter between Chinese and Westerners have been defining texts of European cultures and their descendants. Successive but sporadic reports from travellers, missionaries, diplomats, traders and others have provided a model of an alternative way of arranging people, of organizing their lives, of thinking about the state of being human; one that described a government that was, or at least was represented as being, as authoritative as anything at home, with military power that could challenge any other, and with cultural achievements as profound. Traditionally labelled “inscrutable”, China nonetheless possessed a written literature, an esteemed bureaucracy, technological achievements, complex financial systems, codes and courts of law, and religions that had texts, buildings and hierarchies of priests. In other words, though not like us at all, they were exactly like us.
dc.format20 pages
dc.publisherAustralian National University
dc.rightshttp://epress.anu.edu.au/faqs/faqs_copyright.html#1 "Authors are not permitted to publish works published by ANU E Press on any other web site except their personal sites or sites associated with their institutions, as long as these are non-commercial sites. Authors are permitted to post the title and abstract of their book on any relevant web site as well as posting links on any site that direct readers to ANU E Press site." - from publisher web site (as at 19/02/10)
dc.sourceHumanities Research
dc.source.urihttp://epress.anu.edu.au/hrj/2007_01/pdf/ch03.pdf
dc.source.urihttp://epress.anu.edu.au/hrj/2007_01/html/frames.php
dc.titleMore than one Adam? Revelation and philology in nineteenth-century China
dc.typeJournal article
local.identifier.citationvolumeXIV
dc.date.issued2009-08-31T04:56:19Z
local.identifier.absfor210302
local.identifier.ariespublicationu7700279xPUB22
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationPenny, Benjamin D C, Research School of Pacific and Asian Studies, Division of Pacific and Asian History
local.bibliographicCitation.issue1
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage31
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage50
dc.date.updated2015-12-08T03:16:26Z
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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