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Climate variability, social and environmental factors, and Ross River virus transmission: research development and future research needs

Tong, S; Dale, Pat; Nicholls, Neville; MacKenzie, J S; Wolff, Rodney; McMichael, Anthony

Description

BACKGROUND: Arbovirus diseases have emerged as a global public health concern. However, the impact of climatic, social, and environmental variability on the transmission of arbovirus diseases remains to be determined. OBJECTIVE: Our goal for this study was to provide an overview of research development and future research directions about the interrelationship between climate variability, social and environmental factors, and the transmission of Ross River virus (RRV), the most common and...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorTong, S
dc.contributor.authorDale, Pat
dc.contributor.authorNicholls, Neville
dc.contributor.authorMacKenzie, J S
dc.contributor.authorWolff, Rodney
dc.contributor.authorMcMichael, Anthony
dc.date.accessioned2009-06-24T04:04:39Z
dc.date.accessioned2010-12-20T06:04:11Z
dc.date.available2009-06-24T04:04:39Z
dc.date.available2010-12-20T06:04:11Z
dc.identifier.citationEnvironmental Health Perspectives 116.12 (2008): 1591-1597
dc.identifier.issn0091-6765
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10440/530
dc.identifier.urihttp://digitalcollections.anu.edu.au/handle/10440/530
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Arbovirus diseases have emerged as a global public health concern. However, the impact of climatic, social, and environmental variability on the transmission of arbovirus diseases remains to be determined. OBJECTIVE: Our goal for this study was to provide an overview of research development and future research directions about the interrelationship between climate variability, social and environmental factors, and the transmission of Ross River virus (RRV), the most common and widespread arbovirus disease in Australia. METHODS: We conducted a systematic literature search on climatic, social, and environmental factors and RRV disease. Potentially relevant studies were identified from a series of electronic searches. RESULTS: The body of evidence revealed that the transmission cycles of RRV disease appear to be sensitive to climate and tidal variability. Rainfall, temperature, and high tides were among major determinants of the transmission of RRV disease at the macro level. However, the nature and magnitude of the interrelationship between climate variability, mosquito density, and the transmission of RRV disease varied with geographic area and socioenvironmental condition. Projected anthropogenic global climatic change may result in an increase in RRV infections, and the key determinants of RRV transmission we have identified here may be useful in the development of an early warning system. CONCLUSIONS: The analysis indicates that there is a complex relationship between climate variability, social and environmental factors, and RRV transmission. Different strategies may be needed for the control and prevention of RRV disease at different levels. These research findings could be used as an additional tool to support decision making in disease control/surveillance and risk management.
dc.format7 pages
dc.publisherNational Institute of Environmental Sciences
dc.rightshttp://ehp03.niehs.nih.gov/static/instructions.action "EHP is a publication of the U.S. Government. Publication of EHP lies in the public domain and is therefore without copyright" - from journal web site (as at 23/02/10)
dc.sourceEnvironmental Health Perspectives
dc.source.urihttp://www.ehponline.org/members/2008/11680/11680.pdf
dc.source.urihttp://www.ehponline.org/members/2008/11680/11680.html
dc.subjectclimate variability
dc.subjectearly warning system
dc.subjectRoss River virus transmission
dc.subjectsocial and environmental factors
dc.titleClimate variability, social and environmental factors, and Ross River virus transmission: research development and future research needs
dc.typeJournal article
local.identifier.citationvolume116
dcterms.dateAccepted2008-07-23
dc.date.issued2008-07-24
local.identifier.absfor111706
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4468094xPUB61
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationTong, S, Queensland University of Technology
local.contributor.affiliationDale, Pat, Griffith University
local.contributor.affiliationNicholls, Neville, Monash University
local.contributor.affiliationMacKenzie, J S, Curtin University of Technology
local.contributor.affiliationWolff, Rodney, Queensland University of Technology
local.contributor.affiliationMcMichael, Anthony, National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health
local.bibliographicCitation.issue12
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1591
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage1597
local.identifier.doi10.1289/ehp.11680
dc.date.updated2015-12-08T07:22:38Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-58149342062
local.identifier.thomsonID000261290300018
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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