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Linking future ecosystem services and future human well-being

Butler, Colin; Oluoch-Kosura, Willis

Description

Ecosystem services are necessary, yet not sufficient for human well-being (however defined). Insufficient access to the ecosystem provisioning service of food is a particularly important factor in the loss of human well-being, but all ecosystem services contribute in some way to well-being. Although perhaps long obvious to ecologists, the links between ecosystems and aspects of human well-being, including health, have been less well understood among the social science community. This situation...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorButler, Colin
dc.contributor.authorOluoch-Kosura, Willis
dc.date.accessioned2009-06-24T02:26:55Z
dc.date.accessioned2010-12-20T06:03:33Z
dc.date.available2009-06-24T02:26:55Z
dc.date.available2010-12-20T06:03:33Z
dc.identifier.citationEcology and Society 11.1 article 30 (2006)
dc.identifier.issn1708-3087
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10440/525
dc.identifier.urihttp://digitalcollections.anu.edu.au/handle/10440/525
dc.description.abstractEcosystem services are necessary, yet not sufficient for human well-being (however defined). Insufficient access to the ecosystem provisioning service of food is a particularly important factor in the loss of human well-being, but all ecosystem services contribute in some way to well-being. Although perhaps long obvious to ecologists, the links between ecosystems and aspects of human well-being, including health, have been less well understood among the social science community. This situation may now be starting to change, thanks in part to the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (MA). Causality between ecosystem services and well-being is bidirectional; it is increasingly clear that functioning societies can protect or enhance ecosystem services, and accordingly, that societies with impaired well-being (best documented in the case of chronic diseases such as malaria and HIV/AIDS) can also experience a related decline in ecosystem services. The future state of human well-being and of ecosystem services is more than the co-evolution of these two fundamental elements. Human well-being also depends, critically, upon the human institutions that govern relationships between human individuals and groups, and also between humans and ecosystem services. The scenarios working group of the MA found that human well-being is highest in the Global Orchestration scenario, which assumes the fastest evolution of beneficial institutions, and is lowest in the Order from Strength scenario. Human well-being was found to be intermediate in the other two scenarios (Adapting Mosaic and Techno-Garden) even though these scenarios share a much greater recognition of the importance of ecosystem services to human well-being.
dc.format16 pages
dc.publisherResilience Alliance
dc.rightshttp://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/search.php "Author can archive pre-print (ie pre-refereeing), … post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing) [and] … publisher's version/PDF … Published source must be acknowledged." - from SHERPA/RoMEO site (as at 23/02/10)
dc.sourceEcology and Society
dc.source.urihttp://www.ecologyandsociety.org/vol11/iss1/art30/ES-2005-1602.pdf
dc.source.urihttp://www.ecologyandsociety.org/vol11/iss1/art30/
dc.subjectcognitive potential
dc.subjectconflict
dc.subjectecosystems
dc.subjecthealth
dc.subjecthuman well-being
dc.subjecthunger
dc.subjectnutrition
dc.subjectscenarios
dc.subjectsurprise
dc.titleLinking future ecosystem services and future human well-being
dc.typeJournal article
local.identifier.citationvolume11
dc.date.issued2006
local.identifier.absfor111706
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4054856xPUB18
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationButler, Colin, National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health
local.contributor.affiliationOluoch-Kosura, Willis, University of Nairobi
local.bibliographicCitation.issue1
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage30
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage45
dc.date.updated2015-12-08T03:11:32Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-33745912240
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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