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Civilizing techniques: Transparency International and the spread of anti-corruption

Larmour, Peter

Description

Transparency International (TI) is an international non government organisation founded in 1993 to combat corruption in international business activities. The paper looks at TI both as an agent and critic of ‘market civilisation’, paying particular attention to some of the techniques has developed including: networking; the franchising of national chapters; the publication of an annual ‘Corruption Perceptions Index’; the publication of a ‘Source Book’ on the web; and the development of Business...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorLarmour, Peter
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-15T00:15:52Z
dc.date.accessioned2010-12-20T06:06:00Z
dc.date.available2010-10-15T00:15:52Z
dc.date.available2010-12-20T06:06:00Z
dc.identifier.citationLarmour, P. (2005). Civilizing techniques: Transparency International and the spread of anti-corruption. Policy and Governance Discussion Paper 05-11 Canberra, ACT: Crawford School of Economics and Government, The Australian National University.
dc.identifier.isbn415375452
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10440/1158
dc.description.abstractTransparency International (TI) is an international non government organisation founded in 1993 to combat corruption in international business activities. The paper looks at TI both as an agent and critic of ‘market civilisation’, paying particular attention to some of the techniques has developed including: networking; the franchising of national chapters; the publication of an annual ‘Corruption Perceptions Index’; the publication of a ‘Source Book’ on the web; and the development of Business Principles for Countering Bribery. Civilisation may be a coercive process, and the paper is particularly concerned with the kinds of power deployed in these techniques. It analyses them as examples of ‘policy transfer’ and as the results of processes of mimicry and professionalisation that lead to ‘institutional isomorphism’, and draws some conclusions about the spread of civilisation.
dc.format.extent16 pages
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherCrawford School of Economics and Government, The Australian National University
dc.relation.ispartofGlobal Standards of Market Civilization
dc.relation.ispartofseriesDiscussion Paper: no. PDP05-11
dc.relation.isversionof1 Edition
dc.rightsAuthor/s retain copyright
dc.source.urihttp://www.crawford.anu.edu.au/degrees/pogo/discussion_papers/PDP05-11.pdf
dc.titleCivilizing techniques: Transparency International and the spread of anti-corruption
dc.typeWorking/Technical Paper
dc.date.issued2005
local.identifier.absfor140210 - International Economics and International Finance
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4132787xPUB55
local.publisher.urlhttp://www.crawford.anu.edu.au
local.type.statusPublished version
local.contributor.affiliationLarmour, Peter, College of Asia and the Pacific, ANU
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage95
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage106
dc.date.updated2015-12-08T03:45:34Z
local.bibliographicCitation.placeofpublicationCanberra, ACT, Australia
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
dc.provenancePermission granted to archive the paper and make it publically available
CollectionsANU Crawford School of Public Policy

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