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On the theory of decentralization, forests and livelihoods

Tacconi, Luca; Siagian, Yulia; Syam, Ronny

Description

The current theory and narrative states that democratic decentralization of forest management leads to sustainable forest management and improved livelihoods. Three assumptions underlie this theory and narrative: i) democratic decentralization is a means of institutionalizing and scaling up community-based natural resource management; ii) rural people benefit from the forest and will conserve it; iii) the success of decentralization can be measured by lack (or lower rates) of deforestation. The...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorTacconi, Luca
dc.contributor.authorSiagian, Yulia
dc.contributor.authorSyam, Ronny
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-12T04:17:40Z
dc.date.accessioned2010-12-20T06:05:45Z
dc.date.available2010-10-12T04:17:40Z
dc.date.available2010-12-20T06:05:45Z
dc.identifier.citationTacconi, L., Siagian, Y. & Syam, R. (2006). On the theory of decentralization, forests and livelihoods. Environmental Management & Development Occasional Paper 09. Canberra, ACT: Asia Pacific School of Economics and Government, The Australian National University.
dc.identifier.issn1447-6975
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10440/1126
dc.identifier.urihttp://digitalcollections.anu.edu.au/handle/10440/1126
dc.description.abstractThe current theory and narrative states that democratic decentralization of forest management leads to sustainable forest management and improved livelihoods. Three assumptions underlie this theory and narrative: i) democratic decentralization is a means of institutionalizing and scaling up community-based natural resource management; ii) rural people benefit from the forest and will conserve it; iii) the success of decentralization can be measured by lack (or lower rates) of deforestation. The paper argues that the first two assumptions do not hold when tested with primary and secondary data and that the third assumption is incorrect and should be discarded. A revised theory of decentralized forest management needs to be developed and an initial sketch is discussed.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis item was commisioned by Asia Pacific School of Economics and Government, ANU
dc.format18 pages
dc.publisherCanberra, ACT: Environmental Management and Development Programme, Asia Pacific School of Economics and Government, Australian National University
dc.rightsAuthors own the copyright. Permission granted to archive the paper and make it publicly available
dc.source.urihttp://www.crawford.anu.edu.au/degrees/emd/occasional_edits/emd_op9.pdf
dc.subjectdecentralization
dc.subjectforests
dc.subjectpoverty
dc.subjectlivelihoods
dc.subjectIndonesia
dc.titleOn the theory of decentralization, forests and livelihoods
dc.typeWorking/Technical Paper
dc.date.issued2006
local.identifier.absfor070504 - Forestry Management and Environment
local.identifier.ariespublicationu3700390xPUB109
local.publisher.urlhttp://www.crawford.anu.edu.au
local.type.statusPublished version
local.contributor.affiliationTacconi, Luca, College of Asia and the Pacific, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationSiagian, Yulia, Center for International Forestry Research
local.contributor.affiliationSyam, Ronny, PT Quest Geophysical Asia
local.identifier.absseo820199 - Forestry not elsewhere classified
dc.date.updated2016-06-14T08:55:44Z
local.bibliographicCitation.placeofpublicationCanberra, Austrralia
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
CollectionsANU College of Asia & the Pacific

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