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Relationship breakdown and the economic welfare of Australian mothers and their children

Gray, Matthew; Chapman, Bruce

Description

This paper provides estimates of the effects of divorce on the lifetime incomes of mothers. This is an issue that is not well explored in most countries, and has been essentially untouched empirically in the Australian context. The paper extends the existingliterature, which has generally focused on the short-term economic implications of divorce for mothers. Simulations are used to provide insights into the impact of divorce for a host of disparate circumstances. It is found that the relative...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorGray, Matthew
dc.contributor.authorChapman, Bruce
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-12T01:05:29Z
dc.date.accessioned2010-12-20T06:04:56Z
dc.date.available2010-10-12T01:05:29Z
dc.date.available2010-12-20T06:04:56Z
dc.identifier.citationGray, M.C. & Chapman, B. (2007). Relationship breakdown and the economic welfare of Australian mothers and their children. Policy and Governance Discussion Paper 07-08. Canberra,ACT: Crawford School of Economics and Government, The Australian National University.
dc.identifier.issn1328-1143
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10440/1121
dc.description.abstractThis paper provides estimates of the effects of divorce on the lifetime incomes of mothers. This is an issue that is not well explored in most countries, and has been essentially untouched empirically in the Australian context. The paper extends the existingliterature, which has generally focused on the short-term economic implications of divorce for mothers. Simulations are used to provide insights into the impact of divorce for a host of disparate circumstances. It is found that the relative income costs of divorce differ greatly depending upon the relative earnings capacity of the mother and father. Women with a much lower earning capacity than their partner face particularly large income costs of divorce. It is also found that the relative income costs of divorce fall as the number of children increases. The importance of child support payment to the household income of mothers following divorce is highlighted. It is found that the income of mothers would be higher if they received child support levels commensurate with the government’s non- resident parent child support rules, rather than what they report actually receiving.
dc.format.extent36 pages
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherCrawford School of Economics and Government, The Australian National University
dc.rightsAuthor/s retain copyright
dc.source.urihttp://www.crawford.anu.edu.au/degrees/pogo/discussion_papers/PDP07-08.pdf
dc.titleRelationship breakdown and the economic welfare of Australian mothers and their children
dc.typeWorking/Technical Paper
local.identifier.citationvolume10
dc.date.issued2007
local.identifier.absfor160506 - Education Policy
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4055784xPUB225
local.publisher.urlhttp://www.crawford.anu.edu.au
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationChapman, Bruce, College of Asia and the Pacific, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationGray, Matthew C, Australian Institute of Family Studies
local.bibliographicCitation.issue4
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage253
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage277
local.identifier.absseo940112 - Families and Family Services
dc.date.updated2015-12-09T10:23:50Z
local.bibliographicCitation.placeofpublicationCanberra, ACT, Australia
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
dc.provenancePermission granted to archive the paper and make it publically available
CollectionsANU Crawford School of Public Policy

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